From Schubert's the Judicial Mind to Spaeth's U.S. Supreme Court Judicial Data Base: a crossvalidation

Title:
From Schubert's the Judicial Mind to Spaeth's U.S. Supreme Court Judicial Data Base: a crossvalidation
Authors:
Djupe, Paul A.; Epstein, Lee
Citation:
Djupe, Paul A. and Lee Epstein. (1998). “From Schubert’s The Judicial Mind to Spaeth’s U.S. Supreme Court Judicial Data Base: A Crossvalidation.” American Journal of Political Science 42(3): 1012-19.
Publisher:
American Journal of Political Science
DATE ISSUED:
Jul-1998
PERMANENT LINK:
http://hdl.handle.net/2374.DEN/5062; http://hdl.handle.net/2374
Type:
Article
Language:
en_US
Description:
Since 1990, when Spaeth made public his U.S. Supreme Court Judicial Data Base, scholars of courts and law have possessed a reproducible and reliable data set from which to conduct their analyses. Such was not always the case: many of the field's foundational studies relied on information that would not pass muster under current standards governing data collection. We crossvalidate a model from one of these studies (Epstein, Walker, and Dixon 1989), which relied heavily on data collected by Schubert (1976), with data derived from the Spaeth Data Base. The crossvalidation was only a partial success, with a key variable (prior behavior) failing to obtain statistical significance. While this finding may carry important implications for scholarship on Supreme Court decision making, the more general lesson of our effort is this: Simply because judicial specialists (or those in other fields for that matter) now have outstanding public data bases, it does not follow that they can ignore issues of measurement, reproducibility, reliability, and verification. Too many of the seminal studies and important constructs evolved from data bases that were something short of outstanding. This suggests the need for more crossvalidations of older work against data gathered in accord with contemporary standards.
ISSN:
00925853
Appears in Collections:
Faculty Publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDjupe, Paul A.en
dc.contributor.authorEpstein, Leeen
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-02T20:24:53Zen
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-18T21:07:35Z-
dc.date.available2013-01-02T20:24:53Zen
dc.date.available2013-12-18T21:07:35Z-
dc.date.created1998-07en
dc.date.issued1998-07en
dc.identifier.citationDjupe, Paul A. and Lee Epstein. (1998). “From Schubert’s The Judicial Mind to Spaeth’s U.S. Supreme Court Judicial Data Base: A Crossvalidation.” American Journal of Political Science 42(3): 1012-19.en_US
dc.identifier.issn00925853en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2374.DEN/5062en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2374-
dc.descriptionSince 1990, when Spaeth made public his U.S. Supreme Court Judicial Data Base, scholars of courts and law have possessed a reproducible and reliable data set from which to conduct their analyses. Such was not always the case: many of the field's foundational studies relied on information that would not pass muster under current standards governing data collection. We crossvalidate a model from one of these studies (Epstein, Walker, and Dixon 1989), which relied heavily on data collected by Schubert (1976), with data derived from the Spaeth Data Base. The crossvalidation was only a partial success, with a key variable (prior behavior) failing to obtain statistical significance. While this finding may carry important implications for scholarship on Supreme Court decision making, the more general lesson of our effort is this: Simply because judicial specialists (or those in other fields for that matter) now have outstanding public data bases, it does not follow that they can ignore issues of measurement, reproducibility, reliability, and verification. Too many of the seminal studies and important constructs evolved from data bases that were something short of outstanding. This suggests the need for more crossvalidations of older work against data gathered in accord with contemporary standards.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Journal of Political Scienceen_US
dc.relation.ispartofFaculty Publicationsen_US
dc.titleFrom Schubert's the Judicial Mind to Spaeth's U.S. Supreme Court Judicial Data Base: a crossvalidationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.institutionDenison Universityen_US
dc.date.digitized2013-01-02en
dc.contributor.repositoryDenison Resource Commonsen_US
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