Justification not by faith alone: Clergy generating trust and certainty by revealing thought

Title:
Justification not by faith alone: Clergy generating trust and certainty by revealing thought
Authors:
Djupe, Paul A.; Calfano, Brian R.
Citation:
Djupe, Paul A. and Brian R. Calfano. (2009). “Justification Not by Faith Alone: Clergy Generating Trust and Certainty by Revealing Thought.” Politics & Religion 2(1): 1-30.
Publisher:
Politics and Religion
DATE ISSUED:
Aug-2009
PERMANENT LINK:
http://hdl.handle.net/2374.DEN/5053; http://hdl.handle.net/2374
Type:
Article
Language:
en_US
Description:
While our intuition is that religious elites influence the political behavior of their audiences, just how that influence takes place is essentially unknown. Among many possible mechanisms, we investigate a new one: the effects of the decision-making process information that is included in elite statements. We believe that “process cues” paralleling those preferred by respondents bolster trust in the source and augment the ability to form determined attitudes. We test this proposition in the context of a survey experiment that focuses on environmental racism. We present competing arguments provided by a reverend and a professor, variably assigning the arguments and presence of elite process cues. We find that process cues do affect trust and attitudinal ambivalence, but in ways that challenge some pervasive assumptions about the integrity and importance of religious groups in politics.
ISSN:
17550491; 17550483
Appears in Collections:
Faculty Publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDjupe, Paul A.en
dc.contributor.authorCalfano, Brian R.en
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-02T19:41:03Zen
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-18T21:07:20Z-
dc.date.available2013-01-02T19:41:03Zen
dc.date.available2013-12-18T21:07:20Z-
dc.date.created2009-08en
dc.date.issued2009-08en
dc.identifier.citationDjupe, Paul A. and Brian R. Calfano. (2009). “Justification Not by Faith Alone: Clergy Generating Trust and Certainty by Revealing Thought.” Politics & Religion 2(1): 1-30.en_US
dc.identifier.issn17550491en
dc.identifier.issn17550483en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2374.DEN/5053en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2374-
dc.descriptionWhile our intuition is that religious elites influence the political behavior of their audiences, just how that influence takes place is essentially unknown. Among many possible mechanisms, we investigate a new one: the effects of the decision-making process information that is included in elite statements. We believe that “process cues” paralleling those preferred by respondents bolster trust in the source and augment the ability to form determined attitudes. We test this proposition in the context of a survey experiment that focuses on environmental racism. We present competing arguments provided by a reverend and a professor, variably assigning the arguments and presence of elite process cues. We find that process cues do affect trust and attitudinal ambivalence, but in ways that challenge some pervasive assumptions about the integrity and importance of religious groups in politics.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherPolitics and Religionen_US
dc.relation.ispartofFaculty Publicationsen_US
dc.titleJustification not by faith alone: Clergy generating trust and certainty by revealing thoughten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.institutionDenison Universityen_US
dc.date.digitized2013-01-02en
dc.contributor.repositoryDenison Resource Commonsen_US
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