Politics and church: Byproduct or central mission?

Title:
Politics and church: Byproduct or central mission?
Authors:
Djupe, Paul A.; Gilbert, Christopher P.
Citation:
Djupe, Paul A. and Christopher P. Gilbert. (2008). “Politics and Church: Byproduct or Central Mission” Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 47(1): 45-62.
Publisher:
Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion
DATE ISSUED:
Mar-2008
PERMANENT LINK:
http://hdl.handle.net/2374.DEN/5048; http://hdl.handle.net/2374
Type:
Article
Language:
en_US
Description:
One of the more intriguing paradoxes that has developed in mainline Protestantism over the last 30 years is that mainline clergy have become more politically active. Since the public politicking of mainline clergy in the late 1960s generated storms in the churches, why would clergy become more politically active over time? In this article, we adopt the theoretical structure of a benefit exchange between leaders and members initiated by Mancur Olson. We seek to determine the extent to which church members' appetites for political action by the clergy are shaped by a satiating selective benefit exchange or are driven largely by political compatibility. We propose that because of continued political disagreement between clergy and church members and considerable disapproval of clergy involvement in politics by church members, clergy politicking is allowed largely by the satisfaction of a selective benefit exchange.
ISSN:
00218294
Appears in Collections:
Faculty Publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDjupe, Paul A.en
dc.contributor.authorGilbert, Christopher P.en
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-02T19:28:24Zen
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-18T21:06:54Z-
dc.date.available2013-01-02T19:28:24Zen
dc.date.available2013-12-18T21:06:54Z-
dc.date.created2008-03en
dc.date.issued2008-03en
dc.identifier.citationDjupe, Paul A. and Christopher P. Gilbert. (2008). “Politics and Church: Byproduct or Central Mission” Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 47(1): 45-62.en_US
dc.identifier.issn00218294en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2374.DEN/5048en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2374-
dc.descriptionOne of the more intriguing paradoxes that has developed in mainline Protestantism over the last 30 years is that mainline clergy have become more politically active. Since the public politicking of mainline clergy in the late 1960s generated storms in the churches, why would clergy become more politically active over time? In this article, we adopt the theoretical structure of a benefit exchange between leaders and members initiated by Mancur Olson. We seek to determine the extent to which church members' appetites for political action by the clergy are shaped by a satiating selective benefit exchange or are driven largely by political compatibility. We propose that because of continued political disagreement between clergy and church members and considerable disapproval of clergy involvement in politics by church members, clergy politicking is allowed largely by the satisfaction of a selective benefit exchange.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherJournal for the Scientific Study of Religionen_US
dc.relation.ispartofFaculty Publicationsen_US
dc.titlePolitics and church: Byproduct or central mission?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.institutionDenison Universityen_US
dc.date.digitized2013-01-02en
dc.contributor.repositoryDenison Resource Commonsen_US
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