When primary campaigns go negative: The determinants of campaign negativity

Title:
When primary campaigns go negative: The determinants of campaign negativity
Authors:
Djupe, Paul A.; Peterson, David A.M.
Citation:
Peterson, David A.M. and Paul A. Djupe. (2005). “When Primary Campaigns Go Negative: The Determinants of Campaign Negativity.” Political Research Quarterly 58(1): 45-54.
Publisher:
Political Research Quarterly
DATE ISSUED:
Mar-2005
PERMANENT LINK:
http://hdl.handle.net/2374.DEN/5042; http://hdl.handle.net/2374
Type:
Article
Language:
en_US
Description:
Standard investigations of both campaign negativity and primary elections focus on either the electoral institutions or the primary voters. In this article, we begin to explore the factors affecting the content of the information environment voters face by examining the effects of timing and electoral context on which primary races are likely to become negative and when. Using a content analysis of newspaper coverage of every contested Senate primary in 1998, and binary time-series cross-sectional methods, we demonstrate that negativity is an interdependent function of the timing of the race, the status of the Senate seat, and the number and quality of the challengers in the primary.
ISSN:
10659129
Appears in Collections:
Faculty Publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDjupe, Paul A.en
dc.contributor.authorPeterson, David A.M.en
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-02T19:10:40Zen
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-18T21:08:02Z-
dc.date.available2013-01-02T19:10:40Zen
dc.date.available2013-12-18T21:08:02Z-
dc.date.created2005-03en
dc.date.issued2005-03en
dc.identifier.citationPeterson, David A.M. and Paul A. Djupe. (2005). “When Primary Campaigns Go Negative: The Determinants of Campaign Negativity.” Political Research Quarterly 58(1): 45-54.en_US
dc.identifier.issn10659129en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2374.DEN/5042en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2374-
dc.descriptionStandard investigations of both campaign negativity and primary elections focus on either the electoral institutions or the primary voters. In this article, we begin to explore the factors affecting the content of the information environment voters face by examining the effects of timing and electoral context on which primary races are likely to become negative and when. Using a content analysis of newspaper coverage of every contested Senate primary in 1998, and binary time-series cross-sectional methods, we demonstrate that negativity is an interdependent function of the timing of the race, the status of the Senate seat, and the number and quality of the challengers in the primary.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherPolitical Research Quarterlyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofFaculty Publicationsen_US
dc.titleWhen primary campaigns go negative: The determinants of campaign negativityen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.institutionDenison Universityen_US
dc.date.digitized2013-01-02en
dc.contributor.repositoryDenison Resource Commonsen_US
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