Religious brand loyalty and political loyalties

Title:
Religious brand loyalty and political loyalties
Authors:
Djupe, Paul A.
Citation:
Djupe, Paul A. (2000). “Religious Brand Loyalty and Political Loyalties.” Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 39(1): 78-89.
Publisher:
Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion
DATE ISSUED:
Mar-2000
PERMANENT LINK:
http://hdl.handle.net/2374.DEN/5039; http://hdl.handle.net/2374
Type:
Article
Language:
en_US
Description:
Numerous works have detailed the breakdown of brand loyalty within society over the last forty years and its results. Whether examining political loyalties, religious loyalties, or loyalties to brands such as Lucky Strike cigarettes, each study has noted a lowering of traditional barriers to switching brands and the creation of a nation of individualist choosers (Friedman 1990). Here I attempt to suggest some connections between religious and political loyalties. Using the 1993 General Social Survey, I operationalize religious loyalty in four ways and suggest three mechanisms through which religious loyalty is connected to political loyalty: psychological ties, social ties, and social circumstances. I find significant effects of different conceptions of religious loyalty encouraging party loyalties, steadfast voting, and loyalty to one party's presidential candidates across two elections.
ISSN:
00218294
Appears in Collections:
Faculty Publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDjupe, Paul A.en
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-02T19:03:15Zen
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-18T21:06:51Z-
dc.date.available2013-01-02T19:03:15Zen
dc.date.available2013-12-18T21:06:51Z-
dc.date.created2000-03en
dc.date.issued2000-03en
dc.identifier.citationDjupe, Paul A. (2000). “Religious Brand Loyalty and Political Loyalties.” Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 39(1): 78-89.en_US
dc.identifier.issn00218294en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2374.DEN/5039en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2374-
dc.descriptionNumerous works have detailed the breakdown of brand loyalty within society over the last forty years and its results. Whether examining political loyalties, religious loyalties, or loyalties to brands such as Lucky Strike cigarettes, each study has noted a lowering of traditional barriers to switching brands and the creation of a nation of individualist choosers (Friedman 1990). Here I attempt to suggest some connections between religious and political loyalties. Using the 1993 General Social Survey, I operationalize religious loyalty in four ways and suggest three mechanisms through which religious loyalty is connected to political loyalty: psychological ties, social ties, and social circumstances. I find significant effects of different conceptions of religious loyalty encouraging party loyalties, steadfast voting, and loyalty to one party's presidential candidates across two elections.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherJournal for the Scientific Study of Religionen_US
dc.relation.ispartofFaculty Publicationsen_US
dc.titleReligious brand loyalty and political loyaltiesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.institutionDenison Universityen_US
dc.date.digitized2013-01-02en
dc.contributor.repositoryDenison Resource Commonsen_US
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