Children's health insurance, family income, and welfare enrollment

Title:
Children's health insurance, family income, and welfare enrollment
Authors:
Saavedra, Martin
Abstract:
Children from wealthier families are more likely to have health insurance than children from poorer families on average. However, the relationship between family income and health insurance is non-linear, as children near the Federal Poverty Line (FPL) are less likely to be insured than children from both wealthier families (who obtain health insurance from the private market) and poorer families (who obtain government-funded health insurance). This health insurance dip has persisted even as Medicaid has been expanded to cover those above the FPL. One explanation for this is that families who are far below the poverty line are better connected to the welfare system, and consequently, are more likely to enroll in Medicaid. This study uses data from the 2001-2013 Current Population Surveys and finds that (1) controlling for many of the determinants of eligibility, those on other forms of government assistance are more likely to have health insurance, and (2) the relationship between family income and children's health insurance status is strictly increasing after controlling for enrollment in other welfare programs.
Citation:
Saavedra, Martin. 2017. "Children's health insurance, family income, and welfare enrollment." Children and Youth Services Review 73: 182-186.
Publisher:
Elsevier
DATE ISSUED:
2017-02
Department:
Economics
Type:
Article
PUBLISHED VERSION:
10.1016/j.childyouth.2016.12.014
Additional Links:
http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0190740916305461
PERMANENT LINK:
http://hdl.handle.net/11282/620530

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSaavedra, Martinen
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-15T18:34:48Z-
dc.date.available2017-09-15T18:34:48Z-
dc.date.issued2017-02-
dc.identifier.citationSaavedra, Martin. 2017. "Children's health insurance, family income, and welfare enrollment." Children and Youth Services Review 73: 182-186.en
dc.identifier.issn0190-7409-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11282/620530-
dc.description.abstractChildren from wealthier families are more likely to have health insurance than children from poorer families on average. However, the relationship between family income and health insurance is non-linear, as children near the Federal Poverty Line (FPL) are less likely to be insured than children from both wealthier families (who obtain health insurance from the private market) and poorer families (who obtain government-funded health insurance). This health insurance dip has persisted even as Medicaid has been expanded to cover those above the FPL. One explanation for this is that families who are far below the poverty line are better connected to the welfare system, and consequently, are more likely to enroll in Medicaid. This study uses data from the 2001-2013 Current Population Surveys and finds that (1) controlling for many of the determinants of eligibility, those on other forms of government assistance are more likely to have health insurance, and (2) the relationship between family income and children's health insurance status is strictly increasing after controlling for enrollment in other welfare programs.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.childyouth.2016.12.014-
dc.relation.urlhttp://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0190740916305461en
dc.subject.departmentEconomicsen_US
dc.titleChildren's health insurance, family income, and welfare enrollmenten_US
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalChildren and Youth Services Reviewen
dc.subject.keywordMedicaiden_US
dc.subject.keywordChildren's health insurance programen_US
dc.subject.keywordHealth insuranceen_US
dc.subject.keywordFederal poverty lineen_US
dc.subject.keywordWelfare enrollmenten_US
dc.identifier.volume73en_US
dc.identifier.issue182en_US
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Children and Youth Services Reviewen
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