The earth is our home: systemic metaphors to redefine our relationship with nature

Title:
The earth is our home: systemic metaphors to redefine our relationship with nature
Authors:
Thibodeau, Paul; Frantz, Cynthia M. ( 0000-0001-9303-3052 ) ; Berretta, Matias
Abstract:
Climate change is one of the most compelling challenges for science communication today. Societal reforms are necessary to reduce the risks posed by a changing climate, yet many people fail to recognize climate change as a serious issue. Unfortunately, the accumulation of scientific data, in itself, has failed to compel the general public on the urgent need for pro-environmental policy action. We argue that certain metaphors for the human-environment relationship can lead people to adopt a more nuanced and responsible conception of their place in the natural world. In two studies, we tested properties of multiple metaphors with the general public (study 1) and experts on climate change (study 2). The metaphor "the earth is our home" resonated with climate experts as well as diverse subpopulations of the general public, including conservatives and climate-change deniers.
Citation:
Thibodeau, Paul H., Cynthia McPherson Frantz, and Matias Berretta. 2017. "The earth is our home: systemic metaphors to redefine our relationship with nature." Climatic Change 142(1-2): 287-300.
Publisher:
Springer Verlag
DATE ISSUED:
2017-05
Department:
Psychology
Type:
Article
PUBLISHED VERSION:
10.1007/s10584-017-1926-z
Additional Links:
http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s10584-017-1926-z
PERMANENT LINK:
http://hdl.handle.net/11282/620516

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorThibodeau, Paulen
dc.contributor.authorFrantz, Cynthia M.en
dc.contributor.authorBerretta, Matiasen
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-14T14:57:33Z-
dc.date.available2017-09-14T14:57:33Z-
dc.date.issued2017-05-
dc.identifier.citationThibodeau, Paul H., Cynthia McPherson Frantz, and Matias Berretta. 2017. "The earth is our home: systemic metaphors to redefine our relationship with nature." Climatic Change 142(1-2): 287-300.en
dc.identifier.issn0165-0009-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11282/620516-
dc.description.abstractClimate change is one of the most compelling challenges for science communication today. Societal reforms are necessary to reduce the risks posed by a changing climate, yet many people fail to recognize climate change as a serious issue. Unfortunately, the accumulation of scientific data, in itself, has failed to compel the general public on the urgent need for pro-environmental policy action. We argue that certain metaphors for the human-environment relationship can lead people to adopt a more nuanced and responsible conception of their place in the natural world. In two studies, we tested properties of multiple metaphors with the general public (study 1) and experts on climate change (study 2). The metaphor "the earth is our home" resonated with climate experts as well as diverse subpopulations of the general public, including conservatives and climate-change deniers.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherSpringer Verlagen
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10584-017-1926-z-
dc.relation.urlhttp://link.springer.com/10.1007/s10584-017-1926-zen
dc.subject.departmentPsychologyen_US
dc.titleThe earth is our home: systemic metaphors to redefine our relationship with natureen_US
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalClimatic Changeen
dc.subject.keywordClimate changeen_US
dc.subject.keywordGovernanceen_US
dc.subject.keywordThinkingen_US
dc.subject.keywordPublicsen_US
dc.identifier.volume142en_US
dc.identifier.issue1-2en_US
dc.identifier.startpage287en_US
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Climatic Changeen
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