Catastrophe in Dialogue: Aeneid 2 and Seneca’s Agamemnon

Title:
Catastrophe in Dialogue: Aeneid 2 and Seneca’s Agamemnon
Authors:
Trinacty, Christopher
Abstract:
The specific context of source material from Aen. 2 impacts its redeployment in Seneca’s prose and poetic works. In his philosophical works, Seneca encourages certain interpretations of Aen. 2 that speak to different audiences’ understanding of that material. The wise man will deduce certain lessons that others may not appreciate. In a similar way, the characters of the Agamemnon act as readers of Aen. 2, and this paper shows how their responses to the fall of Troy not only delineate their personality, but also their worldview. For the chorus, philosophical detachment and the camaraderie of lamentation result from their trauma, while Cassandra acts as a surrogate poet in fashioning her own descriptions of Agamemnon’s death. Allusions to Aen. 2 indicate how Cassandra supports a tragic reading of the fall of Troy, one that will spiral into further violence, furor, and vengeance.
Citation:
Trinacty, Christopher. 2016. “Catastrophe in Dialogue: Aeneid 2 and Seneca’s Agamemnon.” Vergilius 62: 99-114.
Publisher:
The Vergilian Society
DATE ISSUED:
2016
Department:
Classics
Type:
Article
Additional Links:
http://www.jstor.org/stable/90001703
PERMANENT LINK:
http://hdl.handle.net/11282/620422

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorTrinacty, Christopheren
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-02T15:32:05Z-
dc.date.available2017-05-02T15:32:05Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationTrinacty, Christopher. 2016. “Catastrophe in Dialogue: Aeneid 2 and Seneca’s Agamemnon.” Vergilius 62: 99-114.en
dc.identifier.issn0506-7294-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11282/620422-
dc.description.abstractThe specific context of source material from Aen. 2 impacts its redeployment in Seneca’s prose and poetic works. In his philosophical works, Seneca encourages certain interpretations of Aen. 2 that speak to different audiences’ understanding of that material. The wise man will deduce certain lessons that others may not appreciate. In a similar way, the characters of the Agamemnon act as readers of Aen. 2, and this paper shows how their responses to the fall of Troy not only delineate their personality, but also their worldview. For the chorus, philosophical detachment and the camaraderie of lamentation result from their trauma, while Cassandra acts as a surrogate poet in fashioning her own descriptions of Agamemnon’s death. Allusions to Aen. 2 indicate how Cassandra supports a tragic reading of the fall of Troy, one that will spiral into further violence, furor, and vengeance.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe Vergilian Societyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.jstor.org/stable/90001703en
dc.subject.departmentClassicsen_US
dc.titleCatastrophe in Dialogue: Aeneid 2 and Seneca’s Agamemnonen_US
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalVergiliusen
dc.identifier.volume62en_US
dc.identifier.startpage99en_US
All Items in The Five Colleges of Ohio Digital Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.