Why does time seem to fly when we're having fun?

Title:
Why does time seem to fly when we're having fun?
Authors:
Simen, Patrick; Matell, Matthew
Abstract:
Animals use the neurotransmitter dopamine to encode the relationship between their responses and reward. Reinforcement learning theory (1) successfully explains the role of phasic bursts of dopamine in terms of future reward maximization. Yet, dopamine clearly plays other roles in shaping behavior that have no obvious relationship to reinforcement learning, including modulating the rate at which our subjective sense of time grows in real time. On page 1273 of this issue, Soares et al. (2) closely examine the role of dopamine in mice performing a task in which they keep track of the time between two events and make decisions about this temporal duration. The results suggest the need to reassess the leading theory of dopamine function in timing—the dopamine clock hypothesis (3). They may also help explain empirical phenomena that challenge the reinforcement learning account of dopamine function.
Citation:
Simen, Patrick, and Matthew Matell. 2016. "Why does time seem to fly when we're having fun?" Science 354(6317): 1231-1232.
Publisher:
American Association for the Advancement of Science - Green Policies in RoMEO
DATE ISSUED:
2016-12-09
Department:
Neuroscience
Type:
Article
PUBLISHED VERSION:
10.1126/science.aal4021
PERMANENT LINK:
http://hdl.handle.net/11282/620277

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSimen, Patricken
dc.contributor.authorMatell, Matthewen
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-06T19:42:21Z-
dc.date.available2017-01-06T19:42:21Z-
dc.date.issued2016-12-09-
dc.identifier.citationSimen, Patrick, and Matthew Matell. 2016. "Why does time seem to fly when we're having fun?" Science 354(6317): 1231-1232.en
dc.identifier.issn0036-8075-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11282/620277-
dc.description.abstractAnimals use the neurotransmitter dopamine to encode the relationship between their responses and reward. Reinforcement learning theory (1) successfully explains the role of phasic bursts of dopamine in terms of future reward maximization. Yet, dopamine clearly plays other roles in shaping behavior that have no obvious relationship to reinforcement learning, including modulating the rate at which our subjective sense of time grows in real time. On page 1273 of this issue, Soares et al. (2) closely examine the role of dopamine in mice performing a task in which they keep track of the time between two events and make decisions about this temporal duration. The results suggest the need to reassess the leading theory of dopamine function in timing—the dopamine clock hypothesis (3). They may also help explain empirical phenomena that challenge the reinforcement learning account of dopamine function.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherAmerican Association for the Advancement of Science - Green Policies in RoMEOen
dc.identifier.doi10.1126/science.aal4021-
dc.subject.departmentNeuroscienceen_US
dc.titleWhy does time seem to fly when we're having fun?en_US
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalScienceen
dc.subject.keywordDopamine neuronsen_US
dc.subject.keywordIntervalen_US
dc.subject.keywordStriatumen_US
dc.subject.keywordCortexen_US
dc.subject.keywordRewarden_US
dc.subject.keywordPredictionen_US
dc.identifier.volume354en_US
dc.identifier.issue6317en_US
dc.identifier.startpage1231en_US
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