Title:
Time in Psychology
Authors:
Friedman, William J.
Abstract:
This chapter explains the psychological research that over the past century has produced a substantial body of information about the experience of time. Humans and other animals can learn to anticipate the end of regular temporal intervals, probably using special biological timing mechanisms. Although biological timers may play a role in time perception, the registration of internal and external changes and memory for the contents of an interval probably explain most of humans' impressions of the magnitude of brief temporal durations. Our chronological sense of the past is the product of an ability to use what is remembered about an event to reconstruct its location in time, impressions of some quality of memories, such as their vividness, and a process that establishes temporal links among related events. Humans are able to have a sense of their place in time because they possess mental representations of recurrent time patterns. These representations can take several forms, including images and ordered verbal lists. (Publisher summary)
Citation:
Friedman, William J. 2000. "Time in Psychology." In Time in Contemporary Intellectual Thought, vol. 2, edited by Patrick Baert, 295-314. Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2000.
Publisher:
Elsevier
DATE ISSUED:
2000
Department:
Psychology
Type:
Book chapter
PUBLISHED VERSION:
10.1016/S1387-6783(00)80018-5
Series:
AZimuth
Notes:
Chapter 15
PERMANENT LINK:
http://hdl.handle.net/11282/620240

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFriedman, William J.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-04T12:26:37Z-
dc.date.available2016-11-04T12:26:37Z-
dc.date.issued2000-
dc.identifier.citationFriedman, William J. 2000. "Time in Psychology." In Time in Contemporary Intellectual Thought, vol. 2, edited by Patrick Baert, 295-314. Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2000.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11282/620240-
dc.description.abstractThis chapter explains the psychological research that over the past century has produced a substantial body of information about the experience of time. Humans and other animals can learn to anticipate the end of regular temporal intervals, probably using special biological timing mechanisms. Although biological timers may play a role in time perception, the registration of internal and external changes and memory for the contents of an interval probably explain most of humans' impressions of the magnitude of brief temporal durations. Our chronological sense of the past is the product of an ability to use what is remembered about an event to reconstruct its location in time, impressions of some quality of memories, such as their vividness, and a process that establishes temporal links among related events. Humans are able to have a sense of their place in time because they possess mental representations of recurrent time patterns. These representations can take several forms, including images and ordered verbal lists. (Publisher summary)en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S1387-6783(00)80018-5-
dc.subject.departmentPsychologyen_US
dc.titleTime in Psychologyen_US
dc.typeBook chapteren
dc.title.seriesAZimuthen_US
dc.description.notesChapter 15en_US
dc.identifier.isbn978-0-444-82903-0-
dc.identifier.volume2en_US
dc.identifier.startpage295en_US
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