Differentiating location- and distance-based processes in memory for time: An ERP study

Title:
Differentiating location- and distance-based processes in memory for time: An ERP study
Authors:
Curran, Tim; Friedman, William J.
Abstract:
Memory for the time of events may benefit from reconstructive, location-based, and distance-based processes, but these processes are difficult to dissociate with behavioral methods. Neuropsychological research has emphasized the contribution of prefrontal brain mechanisms to memory for time but has not clearly differentiated location- from distance-based processing. The present experiment recorded event-related brain potentials (ERPs) while subjects completed two different temporal memory tests, designed to emphasize either location- or distance-based processing. The subjects’ reports of locationbased versus distance-based strategies and the reaction time pattern validated our experimental manipulation. Late (800–1,800 msec) frontal ERP effects were related to location-based processing. The results provide support for a two-process theory of memory for time and suggest that frontal memory mechanisms are specifically related to reconstructive, location-based processing.
Citation:
Curran, Tim, and William J. Friedman. 2003. "Differentiating location- and distance-based processes in memory for time: An ERP study." Psychonomic Bulletin & Review 10(3): 711-717.
Publisher:
Springer New York LLC
DATE ISSUED:
2003-09
Department:
Psychology
Type:
Article
PUBLISHED VERSION:
10.3758/BF03196536
PERMANENT LINK:
http://hdl.handle.net/11282/620234

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCurran, Timen
dc.contributor.authorFriedman, William J.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-03T18:11:28Z-
dc.date.available2016-11-03T18:11:28Z-
dc.date.issued2003-09-
dc.identifier.citationCurran, Tim, and William J. Friedman. 2003. "Differentiating location- and distance-based processes in memory for time: An ERP study." Psychonomic Bulletin & Review 10(3): 711-717.en
dc.identifier.issn1069-9384-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11282/620234-
dc.description.abstractMemory for the time of events may benefit from reconstructive, location-based, and distance-based processes, but these processes are difficult to dissociate with behavioral methods. Neuropsychological research has emphasized the contribution of prefrontal brain mechanisms to memory for time but has not clearly differentiated location- from distance-based processing. The present experiment recorded event-related brain potentials (ERPs) while subjects completed two different temporal memory tests, designed to emphasize either location- or distance-based processing. The subjects’ reports of locationbased versus distance-based strategies and the reaction time pattern validated our experimental manipulation. Late (800–1,800 msec) frontal ERP effects were related to location-based processing. The results provide support for a two-process theory of memory for time and suggest that frontal memory mechanisms are specifically related to reconstructive, location-based processing.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLCen
dc.identifier.doi10.3758/BF03196536-
dc.subject.departmentPsychologyen_US
dc.titleDifferentiating location- and distance-based processes in memory for time: An ERP studyen_US
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalPsychonomic Bulletin & Reviewen
dc.identifier.volume10en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.startpage711en_US
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