Title:
Arrows of Time in Early Childhood
Authors:
Friedman, William J.
Abstract:
Three studies with 149 children were conducted to provide information about development of the perception of temporally unidirectional transformations, such as dropping blocks or breaking a cookie. Children 3.5 through 6.5 years of age compared forward and backward videotapes of events or made individual judgments of what would happen if the actions were attempted. Even children 3.5 to 4.5 years of age recognized the anomaly of backward versions of gravity and separation events. In addition, relatively few children predicted impossible transformations in the prediction task. The results show that young children, like adults, are sensitive to the unidirectional nature of varied transformations.
Citation:
Friedman, William J. 2003. "Arrows of Time in Early Childhood." Child Development 74(1): 155-167.
Publisher:
Wiley on behalf of Society for Research in Child Development
DATE ISSUED:
2003-02-13
Department:
Psychology
Type:
Article
PUBLISHED VERSION:
10.1111/1467-8624.00527
PERMANENT LINK:
http://hdl.handle.net/11282/620233

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFriedman, William J.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-03T18:06:20Z-
dc.date.available2016-11-03T18:06:20Z-
dc.date.issued2003-02-13-
dc.identifier.citationFriedman, William J. 2003. "Arrows of Time in Early Childhood." Child Development 74(1): 155-167.en
dc.identifier.issn0009-3920-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11282/620233-
dc.description.abstractThree studies with 149 children were conducted to provide information about development of the perception of temporally unidirectional transformations, such as dropping blocks or breaking a cookie. Children 3.5 through 6.5 years of age compared forward and backward videotapes of events or made individual judgments of what would happen if the actions were attempted. Even children 3.5 to 4.5 years of age recognized the anomaly of backward versions of gravity and separation events. In addition, relatively few children predicted impossible transformations in the prediction task. The results show that young children, like adults, are sensitive to the unidirectional nature of varied transformations.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherWiley on behalf of Society for Research in Child Developmenten
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/1467-8624.00527en_US
dc.subject.departmentPsychologyen_US
dc.titleArrows of Time in Early Childhooden_US
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalChild Developmenten
dc.identifier.volume74en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.startpage155en_US
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