Moving While Black: Intergroup Attitudes Influence Judgments of Speed

Title:
Moving While Black: Intergroup Attitudes Influence Judgments of Speed
Authors:
Kenrick, Andreana C.; Sinclair, Stacey; Richeson, Jennifer; Verosky, Sara C.; Lun, Janetta
Abstract:
Four experiments examined whether intergroup attitudes shape the speed with which Blacks are thought to be moving. When participants rated the speed of Black and White faces that appeared to be moving toward them, greater intergroup anxiety was associated with judging Black targets as moving more slowly relative to White targets (Experiments 1a and 1b). Experiment 2 demonstrated that this effect occurs only for approaching targets. Experiment 3 showed that this slowing bias occurs, at least in part, because of the perceived duration of time each image was moving. Such a slowing bias is consistent with the time expansion and perceptual slowing reported by people who experienced threatening events.
Citation:
Kenrick, A.C., S. Sinclair, J. Richeson, S.C.Verosky, and J. Lun. 2016. "Moving While Black: Intergroup Attitudes Influence Judgments of Speed." Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 145(2): 147-154.
Publisher:
American Psychological Association
DATE ISSUED:
2016-02
Department:
Psychology
Type:
Article
PUBLISHED VERSION:
10.1037/xge0000115
PERMANENT LINK:
http://hdl.handle.net/11282/620207

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKenrick, Andreana C.en
dc.contributor.authorSinclair, Staceyen
dc.contributor.authorRicheson, Jenniferen
dc.contributor.authorVerosky, Sara C.en
dc.contributor.authorLun, Janettaen
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-31T17:39:16Z-
dc.date.available2016-10-31T17:39:16Z-
dc.date.issued2016-02-
dc.identifier.citationKenrick, A.C., S. Sinclair, J. Richeson, S.C.Verosky, and J. Lun. 2016. "Moving While Black: Intergroup Attitudes Influence Judgments of Speed." Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 145(2): 147-154.en
dc.identifier.issn0096-3445-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11282/620207-
dc.description.abstractFour experiments examined whether intergroup attitudes shape the speed with which Blacks are thought to be moving. When participants rated the speed of Black and White faces that appeared to be moving toward them, greater intergroup anxiety was associated with judging Black targets as moving more slowly relative to White targets (Experiments 1a and 1b). Experiment 2 demonstrated that this effect occurs only for approaching targets. Experiment 3 showed that this slowing bias occurs, at least in part, because of the perceived duration of time each image was moving. Such a slowing bias is consistent with the time expansion and perceptual slowing reported by people who experienced threatening events.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherAmerican Psychological Associationen
dc.identifier.doi10.1037/xge0000115-
dc.subject.departmentPsychologyen_US
dc.titleMoving While Black: Intergroup Attitudes Influence Judgments of Speeden_US
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Experimental Psychology: Generalen
dc.subject.keywordPrejudiceen_US
dc.subject.keywordMotion perceptionen_US
dc.subject.keywordIntergroup dynamicsen_US
dc.identifier.volume145en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.startpage147en_US
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