Preference for gain- or loss-framed electronic cigarette prevention messages

Title:
Preference for gain- or loss-framed electronic cigarette prevention messages
Authors:
Kong, Grace; Cavallo, Dana A.; Camenga, Deepa R.; Morean, Meghan E. ( 0000-0003-4865-1155 ) ; Krishnan-Sarin, Suchitra
Abstract:
Background: Effective electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) prevention messages are needed to combat the rising popularity/uptake of e-cigarettes among youth. We examined preferences for e-cigarette prevention messages that either emphasized gains (e.g., You save money by not using e-cigarettes) or losses (e.g., You spend money by using e-cigarettes) among adolescents and young adults. Methods: Using surveys in two middle schools, four high schools, and one college in CT (N = 5405), we assessed students' preferences for gain- or loss-framed e-cigarette prevention messages related to four themes: financial cost, health risks, addiction potential, and social labeling as a smoker. We also assessed whether preferences for each message framing theme differed by sex, school level, cigarette-use status, and e-cigarette use-status. We also examined whether preference for message framing differed by cigarette and e-cigarette susceptibility status among never e-cigarette users. Results: Overall, loss-framing was preferred for message themes related to health risks, addiction potential, and social labeling as a smoker, whereas gain-framing was preferred for message themes related to financial cost. Logistic regression analyses showed that 1) females preferred loss-framed messages for all themes relative to males, 2) lifetime e-cigarette users preferred loss-framed health risks and social labeling messages relative to never users, and 3) high school students preferred gain-framed social labeling messages relative to college students. The preference for message framing did not differ by cigarette or e-cigarette susceptibility. Conclusions: Preference for message framing differed by themes and individual characteristics. This formative research could inform the construction of persuasive e-cigarette prevention messages. (C) 2016 Published by Elsevier Ltd.
Citation:
Kong, G., D.A. Cavallo, D.R. Camenga, M.E. Morean, and S. Krishnan-Sarin. 2016. "Preference for gain- or loss-framed electronic cigarette prevention messages." Addictive Behaviors 62: 108-113.
Publisher:
Elsevier
DATE ISSUED:
2016-11
Department:
Psychology
Type:
Article
PUBLISHED VERSION:
10.1016/j.addbeh.2016.06.015
PERMANENT LINK:
http://hdl.handle.net/11282/620184

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKong, Graceen
dc.contributor.authorCavallo, Dana A.en
dc.contributor.authorCamenga, Deepa R.en
dc.contributor.authorMorean, Meghan E.en
dc.contributor.authorKrishnan-Sarin, Suchitraen
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-27T13:42:15Z-
dc.date.available2016-10-27T13:42:15Z-
dc.date.issued2016-11-
dc.identifier.citationKong, G., D.A. Cavallo, D.R. Camenga, M.E. Morean, and S. Krishnan-Sarin. 2016. "Preference for gain- or loss-framed electronic cigarette prevention messages." Addictive Behaviors 62: 108-113.en
dc.identifier.issn0306-4603-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11282/620184-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Effective electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) prevention messages are needed to combat the rising popularity/uptake of e-cigarettes among youth. We examined preferences for e-cigarette prevention messages that either emphasized gains (e.g., You save money by not using e-cigarettes) or losses (e.g., You spend money by using e-cigarettes) among adolescents and young adults. Methods: Using surveys in two middle schools, four high schools, and one college in CT (N = 5405), we assessed students' preferences for gain- or loss-framed e-cigarette prevention messages related to four themes: financial cost, health risks, addiction potential, and social labeling as a smoker. We also assessed whether preferences for each message framing theme differed by sex, school level, cigarette-use status, and e-cigarette use-status. We also examined whether preference for message framing differed by cigarette and e-cigarette susceptibility status among never e-cigarette users. Results: Overall, loss-framing was preferred for message themes related to health risks, addiction potential, and social labeling as a smoker, whereas gain-framing was preferred for message themes related to financial cost. Logistic regression analyses showed that 1) females preferred loss-framed messages for all themes relative to males, 2) lifetime e-cigarette users preferred loss-framed health risks and social labeling messages relative to never users, and 3) high school students preferred gain-framed social labeling messages relative to college students. The preference for message framing did not differ by cigarette or e-cigarette susceptibility. Conclusions: Preference for message framing differed by themes and individual characteristics. This formative research could inform the construction of persuasive e-cigarette prevention messages. (C) 2016 Published by Elsevier Ltd.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.addbeh.2016.06.015-
dc.subject.departmentPsychologyen_US
dc.titlePreference for gain- or loss-framed electronic cigarette prevention messagesen_US
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalAddictive Behaviorsen
dc.subject.keywordMessage framingen_US
dc.subject.keywordElectronic cigarettesen_US
dc.identifier.volume62en_US
dc.identifier.startpage108en_US
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