Extended Metaphors are the Home Runs of Persuasion: Don’t Fumble the Phrase

Title:
Extended Metaphors are the Home Runs of Persuasion: Don’t Fumble the Phrase
Authors:
Thibodeau, Paul
Abstract:
Metaphors pervade discussions of critical issues and influence how people reason about these domains. For instance, when crime is a beast people are more likely to suggest enforcement-oriented approaches to crime-reduction (e.g., by augmenting the police force); reading that crime is a virus, on the other hand, leads people to suggest systemic reforms for the affected community. In the current study, we find that extending metaphoric language into the descriptions of policy interventions bolstered the persuasive influence of metaphoric frames for important issues. That is, in response to a crime virus people were even more likely to endorse social reforms that were described as “treatments,” while in response to a crime beast people were even more likely to endorse “attacking” the problem with harsh enforcement tactics. Of note, people were not simply drawn to extensions of previously instantiated metaphors: when extended metaphors were paired with a conceptually incongruent policy intervention (e.g., “treating” a crime [virus] by augmenting the police force), we found no preference for the policy response.
Citation:
Thibodeau, Paul H. 2016. "Extended Metaphors are the Home Runs of Persuasion: Don’t Fumble the Phrase." Metaphor and Symbol 31(2): 53-72.
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
DATE ISSUED:
2016-04-20
Department:
Psychology
Type:
Article
PUBLISHED VERSION:
10.1080/10926488.2016.1150756
PERMANENT LINK:
http://hdl.handle.net/11282/620180

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorThibodeau, Paulen
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-25T14:22:08Z-
dc.date.available2016-10-25T14:22:08Z-
dc.date.issued2016-04-20-
dc.identifier.citationThibodeau, Paul H. 2016. "Extended Metaphors are the Home Runs of Persuasion: Don’t Fumble the Phrase." Metaphor and Symbol 31(2): 53-72.en
dc.identifier.issn1092-6488-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11282/620180-
dc.description.abstractMetaphors pervade discussions of critical issues and influence how people reason about these domains. For instance, when crime is a beast people are more likely to suggest enforcement-oriented approaches to crime-reduction (e.g., by augmenting the police force); reading that crime is a virus, on the other hand, leads people to suggest systemic reforms for the affected community. In the current study, we find that extending metaphoric language into the descriptions of policy interventions bolstered the persuasive influence of metaphoric frames for important issues. That is, in response to a crime virus people were even more likely to endorse social reforms that were described as “treatments,” while in response to a crime beast people were even more likely to endorse “attacking” the problem with harsh enforcement tactics. Of note, people were not simply drawn to extensions of previously instantiated metaphors: when extended metaphors were paired with a conceptually incongruent policy intervention (e.g., “treating” a crime [virus] by augmenting the police force), we found no preference for the policy response.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/10926488.2016.1150756-
dc.subject.departmentPsychologyen_US
dc.titleExtended Metaphors are the Home Runs of Persuasion: Don’t Fumble the Phraseen_US
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalMetaphor and Symbolen
dc.identifier.volume31en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.startpage53en_US
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