E-cigarette Use Among High School and Middle School Adolescents in Connecticut

Title:
E-cigarette Use Among High School and Middle School Adolescents in Connecticut
Authors:
Krishnan-Sarin, Suchitra; Morean, Meghan E. ( 0000-0003-4865-1155 ) ; Camenga, Deepa R.; Cavallo, Dana A.; Kong, Grace
Abstract:
Introduction: There is limited evidence on electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use among U.S. adolescents. Methods: Cross-sectional, anonymous surveys conducted in 4 high schools (HS; n = 3,614) and 2 middle schools (MS; n = 1,166) in Connecticut in November 2013 examined e-cigarette awareness, use patterns, susceptibility to future use, preferences, product components used (battery type, nicotine content, flavors), and sources of marketing and access. Results: High rates of awareness (MS: 84.3%; HS: 92.0%) and of lifetime (3.5% MS, 25.2 % HS) and current (1.5% MS, 12% HS) use of e-cigarettes was observed. Among those who had not tried e-cigarettes, 26.4% of MS and 31.7% of HS students reported being susceptible to future use. Males (OR = 1.70, p < .01), older students (OR = 1.39, p < .05), Caucasians (OR = 2.01, p < .001), ever cigarette smokers (OR = 13.04, p < .001), and current cigarette smokers (OR = 65.11, p < .001) were more likely to be lifetime e-cigarette users and to report greater future susceptibility (males: OR = 1.30; Caucasians: OR = 1.14; ever cigarette smokers; OR = 3.85; current cigarette smokers; OR = 9.81; ps < .01–.001). Among MS students who were lifetime e-cigarette users, 51.2% reported that e-cigarette was the first tobacco product they had tried. E-cigarettes that were rechargeable and had sweet flavors were most popular. Smokers preferred e-cigarettes to cigarettes. Current cigarette smokers were more likely to initiate with nicotine-containing e-cigarettes, and ever and never cigarette smokers to initiate with e-cigarettes without nicotine. Primary sources for e-cigarette advertisements were televisions and gas stations and, for acquiring e-cigarettes, were peers. Conclusions: Longitudinal monitoring of e-cigarette use among adolescents and establishment of policies to limit access are imperatively needed.
Citation:
Krishnan-Sarin, Suchitra, Meghan E. Morean, Deepa R. Camenga, et al. 2015. "E-cigarette Use Among High School and Middle School Adolescents in Connecticut." Nicotine & Tobacco Research 17(7): 810-818.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press for the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco
DATE ISSUED:
2015-07-01
Department:
Psychology
Type:
Article
PUBLISHED VERSION:
10.1093/ntr/ntu243
Additional Links:
http://ntr.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/doi/10.1093/ntr/ntu243
PERMANENT LINK:
http://hdl.handle.net/11282/613541

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKrishnan-Sarin, Suchitraen
dc.contributor.authorMorean, Meghan E.en
dc.contributor.authorCamenga, Deepa R.en
dc.contributor.authorCavallo, Dana A.en
dc.contributor.authorKong, Graceen
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-17T12:54:00Zen
dc.date.available2016-06-17T12:54:00Zen
dc.date.issued2015-07-01en
dc.identifier.citationKrishnan-Sarin, Suchitra, Meghan E. Morean, Deepa R. Camenga, et al. 2015. "E-cigarette Use Among High School and Middle School Adolescents in Connecticut." Nicotine & Tobacco Research 17(7): 810-818.en
dc.identifier.issn1462-2203en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11282/613541en
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: There is limited evidence on electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use among U.S. adolescents. Methods: Cross-sectional, anonymous surveys conducted in 4 high schools (HS; n = 3,614) and 2 middle schools (MS; n = 1,166) in Connecticut in November 2013 examined e-cigarette awareness, use patterns, susceptibility to future use, preferences, product components used (battery type, nicotine content, flavors), and sources of marketing and access. Results: High rates of awareness (MS: 84.3%; HS: 92.0%) and of lifetime (3.5% MS, 25.2 % HS) and current (1.5% MS, 12% HS) use of e-cigarettes was observed. Among those who had not tried e-cigarettes, 26.4% of MS and 31.7% of HS students reported being susceptible to future use. Males (OR = 1.70, p < .01), older students (OR = 1.39, p < .05), Caucasians (OR = 2.01, p < .001), ever cigarette smokers (OR = 13.04, p < .001), and current cigarette smokers (OR = 65.11, p < .001) were more likely to be lifetime e-cigarette users and to report greater future susceptibility (males: OR = 1.30; Caucasians: OR = 1.14; ever cigarette smokers; OR = 3.85; current cigarette smokers; OR = 9.81; ps < .01–.001). Among MS students who were lifetime e-cigarette users, 51.2% reported that e-cigarette was the first tobacco product they had tried. E-cigarettes that were rechargeable and had sweet flavors were most popular. Smokers preferred e-cigarettes to cigarettes. Current cigarette smokers were more likely to initiate with nicotine-containing e-cigarettes, and ever and never cigarette smokers to initiate with e-cigarettes without nicotine. Primary sources for e-cigarette advertisements were televisions and gas stations and, for acquiring e-cigarettes, were peers. Conclusions: Longitudinal monitoring of e-cigarette use among adolescents and establishment of policies to limit access are imperatively needed.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherOxford University Press for the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobaccoen
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/ntr/ntu243en
dc.relation.urlhttp://ntr.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/doi/10.1093/ntr/ntu243en
dc.subject.departmentPsychologyen_US
dc.titleE-cigarette Use Among High School and Middle School Adolescents in Connecticuten_US
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalNicotine & Tobacco Researchen
dc.identifier.volume17en_US
dc.identifier.issue7en_US
dc.identifier.startpage810en_US
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Nicotine & Tobacco Researchen
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