The Production of Gender Among Black and White Women and Men: The Case of Household Labor

Title:
The Production of Gender Among Black and White Women and Men: The Case of Household Labor
Authors:
John, Daphne; Shelton, Beth Anne
Abstract:
Using the National Survey of Families and Households (N = 13,017; 11.09% Black, 79.99% White), we compare the household labor time of Black and White women and men, and assess the extent to which the time constraint, relative resource, and ideology explanations account for racial and gender differences in housework time. We find that although time constraint, relative resource, and ideology explanations account for some of the variation in housework time, they do not account for all of the gender and racial differences. We also find that paid work and housework trade off differently for Black men than for White men and also for women and men. Finally, a variety of relative resource, time constraint, and ideology factors are associated differently with women’s and men’s housework time. We argue that our findings lend support to the production of gender approach to understanding the division of household labor and that this approach can be used to help us understand racial differences in housework time as well.
Citation:
John, Daphne, and Beth Anne Shelton. 1997. "The Production of Gender Among Black and White Women and Men: The Case of Household Labor." Sex Roles 36(3-4): 171-193.
Publisher:
Springer Verlag
DATE ISSUED:
1997-02
Department:
Sociology
Type:
Article
PUBLISHED VERSION:
10.1007/BF02766266
Additional Links:
http://link.springer.com/10.1007/BF02766266
PERMANENT LINK:
http://hdl.handle.net/11282/605555

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorJohn, Daphneen
dc.contributor.authorShelton, Beth Anneen
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-15T19:27:39Zen
dc.date.available2016-04-15T19:27:39Zen
dc.date.issued1997-02en
dc.identifier.citationJohn, Daphne, and Beth Anne Shelton. 1997. "The Production of Gender Among Black and White Women and Men: The Case of Household Labor." Sex Roles 36(3-4): 171-193.en
dc.identifier.issn0360-0025en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11282/605555en
dc.description.abstractUsing the National Survey of Families and Households (N = 13,017; 11.09% Black, 79.99% White), we compare the household labor time of Black and White women and men, and assess the extent to which the time constraint, relative resource, and ideology explanations account for racial and gender differences in housework time. We find that although time constraint, relative resource, and ideology explanations account for some of the variation in housework time, they do not account for all of the gender and racial differences. We also find that paid work and housework trade off differently for Black men than for White men and also for women and men. Finally, a variety of relative resource, time constraint, and ideology factors are associated differently with women’s and men’s housework time. We argue that our findings lend support to the production of gender approach to understanding the division of household labor and that this approach can be used to help us understand racial differences in housework time as well.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherSpringer Verlagen
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/BF02766266en
dc.relation.urlhttp://link.springer.com/10.1007/BF02766266en
dc.subject.departmentSociologyen_US
dc.titleThe Production of Gender Among Black and White Women and Men: The Case of Household Laboren_US
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalSex Rolesen
dc.identifier.volume36en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.startpage171en_US
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Sex Rolesen
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