Borrowed Borrowings: Nahuatl Loan Words in English

Title:
Borrowed Borrowings: Nahuatl Loan Words in English
Authors:
Haugen, Jason D.
Abstract:
This paper catalogs the words of Nahuatl (aka Mexicano) origin that are attested in the Oxford English Dictionary. These words are cataloged under two classifications: semantic and chronological. Semantically, these words are grouped according to terms pertaining to zoology, botany/horticulture, culinary terms, intoxicants/psychoactives/drugs, mythoreligious terms, cultural items, cultural events, ethnological and linguistic labels, mineralogical terms, and other. Chronologically, words are attested entering the English language in each century since the 1500s, with the earliest borrowing attested in 1555 and the most recent in 1950. Loan words from Nahuatl into English are particularly interesting because they were typically not borrowed due to direct contact with speakers of Nahuatl, but secondarily through contact and trade with speakers of continental and, later, Mexican Spanish, or other European languages.
Citation:
Haugen, Jason D. 2009. "Borrowed Borrowings: Nahuatl Loan Words in English." Lexis: E-Journal in English Lexicology 3: 63-106.
Publisher:
Université Jean Moulin
DATE ISSUED:
2009
Department:
Anthropology
Type:
Article
Additional Links:
http://lexis.univ-lyon3.fr/spip.php?article116
PERMANENT LINK:
http://hdl.handle.net/11282/604112

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHaugen, Jason D.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-31T18:05:52Zen
dc.date.available2016-03-31T18:05:52Zen
dc.date.issued2009en
dc.identifier.citationHaugen, Jason D. 2009. "Borrowed Borrowings: Nahuatl Loan Words in English." Lexis: E-Journal in English Lexicology 3: 63-106.en
dc.identifier.issn1951-6215en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11282/604112en
dc.description.abstractThis paper catalogs the words of Nahuatl (aka Mexicano) origin that are attested in the Oxford English Dictionary. These words are cataloged under two classifications: semantic and chronological. Semantically, these words are grouped according to terms pertaining to zoology, botany/horticulture, culinary terms, intoxicants/psychoactives/drugs, mythoreligious terms, cultural items, cultural events, ethnological and linguistic labels, mineralogical terms, and other. Chronologically, words are attested entering the English language in each century since the 1500s, with the earliest borrowing attested in 1555 and the most recent in 1950. Loan words from Nahuatl into English are particularly interesting because they were typically not borrowed due to direct contact with speakers of Nahuatl, but secondarily through contact and trade with speakers of continental and, later, Mexican Spanish, or other European languages.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherUniversité Jean Moulinen
dc.relation.urlhttp://lexis.univ-lyon3.fr/spip.php?article116en
dc.subject.departmentAnthropologyen_US
dc.titleBorrowed Borrowings: Nahuatl Loan Words in Englishen_US
dc.typeArticleen
dc.subject.keywordLoan wordsen_US
dc.subject.keywordBorrowingen_US
dc.subject.keywordNahuatlen_US
dc.subject.keywordEnglishen_US
dc.identifier.volume3en_US
dc.identifier.startpage63en_US
All Items in The Five Colleges of Ohio Digital Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.