The mental representation of countries

Title:
The mental representation of countries
Authors:
Friedman, William J.; deWinstanley, Patricia A.
Abstract:
Three studies were conducted to describe adults’ knowledge of the countries of the world. Undergraduates from a selective liberal arts college recognised nearly two-thirds of nations, and about one-third were produced in a free-recall task. The use of information related to countries’ locations was an important determinant of order of recall. Contiguity in free-recall output, responses in a free-association task, and the prediction of recall from recognition also provided evidence of other relations between countries, including semantic and phonetic links and membership in groups of countries. The number of times a country was mentioned in the news was a consistent predictor of recognition and recall. The relative prosperity, population density, and geographic area of countries also influenced recall.
Citation:
Friedman, William J., and Patricia A. deWinstanley. 2006. "The mental representation of countries." Memory 14(7): 853-871.
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
DATE ISSUED:
2006-10
Department:
Psychology
Type:
Article
PUBLISHED VERSION:
10.1080/09658210600782925
Additional Links:
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09658210600782925
PERMANENT LINK:
http://hdl.handle.net/11282/601221

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFriedman, William J.en
dc.contributor.authordeWinstanley, Patricia A.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-11T15:06:38Zen
dc.date.available2016-03-11T15:06:38Zen
dc.date.issued2006-10en
dc.identifier.citationFriedman, William J., and Patricia A. deWinstanley. 2006. "The mental representation of countries." Memory 14(7): 853-871.en
dc.identifier.issn0965-8211en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11282/601221en
dc.description.abstractThree studies were conducted to describe adults’ knowledge of the countries of the world. Undergraduates from a selective liberal arts college recognised nearly two-thirds of nations, and about one-third were produced in a free-recall task. The use of information related to countries’ locations was an important determinant of order of recall. Contiguity in free-recall output, responses in a free-association task, and the prediction of recall from recognition also provided evidence of other relations between countries, including semantic and phonetic links and membership in groups of countries. The number of times a country was mentioned in the news was a consistent predictor of recognition and recall. The relative prosperity, population density, and geographic area of countries also influenced recall.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/09658210600782925en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09658210600782925en
dc.subject.departmentPsychologyen_US
dc.titleThe mental representation of countriesen_US
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalMemoryen
dc.subject.keywordGeographical perceptionen_US
dc.subject.keywordMental representationen_US
dc.subject.keywordHumanistic educationen_US
dc.subject.keywordAdult education--Evaluationen_US
dc.subject.keywordResearchen_US
dc.subject.keywordTelevision in geography educationen_US
dc.subject.keywordPopulation densityen_US
dc.identifier.volume14en_US
dc.identifier.issue7en_US
dc.identifier.startpage853en_US
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Memoryen
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