A generation effect can be found during naturalistic learning

Title:
A generation effect can be found during naturalistic learning
Authors:
deWinstanley, Patricia A.
Abstract:
Recently, Carroll and Nelson (1993) presented research suggesting that general-information questions might represent a boundary condition for the generation effect. The present research focused on whether the generation effect did, in fact, generalize to such questions. In Experiment 1, when subjects read or generated the answers to general-information questions, a generation advantage was demonstrated on a 47-h delayed cued-recall test. However, when the Carroll and Nelson procedure was mimicked by requiring subjects to make an initial attempt to answer the questions, the generation advantage was reduced such that it was no longer statistically significant. In Experiments 2 and 3, the findings of the first experiment generalized to a free-recall test. Thus, general-information questions do not represent a boundary condition for the generation effect.
Citation:
DeWinstanley, Patricia A., 1995. "A generation effect can be found during naturalistic learning." Psychonomic Bulletin & Review 2(4): 538-541.
Publisher:
Springer Verlag
DATE ISSUED:
1995-12
Department:
Psychology
Type:
Article
PUBLISHED VERSION:
10.3758/BF03210990
Additional Links:
http://www.springerlink.com/index/10.3758/BF03210990
PERMANENT LINK:
http://hdl.handle.net/11282/601214

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authordeWinstanley, Patricia A.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-11T14:53:35Zen
dc.date.available2016-03-11T14:53:35Zen
dc.date.issued1995-12en
dc.identifier.citationDeWinstanley, Patricia A., 1995. "A generation effect can be found during naturalistic learning." Psychonomic Bulletin & Review 2(4): 538-541.en
dc.identifier.issn1069-9384en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11282/601214en
dc.description.abstractRecently, Carroll and Nelson (1993) presented research suggesting that general-information questions might represent a boundary condition for the generation effect. The present research focused on whether the generation effect did, in fact, generalize to such questions. In Experiment 1, when subjects read or generated the answers to general-information questions, a generation advantage was demonstrated on a 47-h delayed cued-recall test. However, when the Carroll and Nelson procedure was mimicked by requiring subjects to make an initial attempt to answer the questions, the generation advantage was reduced such that it was no longer statistically significant. In Experiments 2 and 3, the findings of the first experiment generalized to a free-recall test. Thus, general-information questions do not represent a boundary condition for the generation effect.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherSpringer Verlagen
dc.identifier.doi10.3758/BF03210990en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.springerlink.com/index/10.3758/BF03210990en
dc.subject.departmentPsychologyen_US
dc.titleA generation effect can be found during naturalistic learningen_US
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalPsychonomic Bulletin & Reviewen
dc.identifier.volume2en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.startpage538en_US
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Psychonomic Bulletin & Reviewen
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