Small molecule modulators of aggregation in synthetic melanin polymerizations

Title:
Small molecule modulators of aggregation in synthetic melanin polymerizations
Authors:
Belitsky, Jason M.; Ellowitz, Micah Z.; Lye, Diane S.; Kilbo, Alexander L.
Abstract:
There are numerous potential applications for melanin-binding compounds, and new methods are of interest to identify melanin-binding agents. A portion of the polymerization to eumelanin, the black to brown pigment in humans, is thought to be supramolecular aggregation of nanoparticles derived from dihydroxyindoles. Starting with chloroquine, a known eumelanin-binding compound, the ability of small molecules to influence aggregation in synthetic eumelanin polymerizations was investigated. Twenty-eight compounds were tested, including pharmaceuticals, dyes, aromatics, and amines. Compounds that either accelerate or delay the appearance of macroscopic particles in synthetic eumelanin polymerizations were uncovered.
Citation:
Belitsky, Jason M., Micah Z. Ellowitz, Diane Lye, and Alexander L. Kilbo. 2012. "Small molecule modulators of aggregation in synthetic melanin polymerizations." Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters 22(17): 5503-5507.
Publisher:
Elsevier for Pergamon
DATE ISSUED:
2012-09
Department:
Chemistry and Biochemistry
Type:
Article
PUBLISHED VERSION:
10.1016/j.bmcl.2012.07.027
Additional Links:
http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0960894X12008943
Notes:
This paper is dedicated to Professor J. Fraser Stoddart on the occasion of his 70th birthday.
PERMANENT LINK:
http://hdl.handle.net/11282/597043

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBelitsky, Jason M.en
dc.contributor.authorEllowitz, Micah Z.en
dc.contributor.authorLye, Diane S.en
dc.contributor.authorKilbo, Alexander L.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-23T16:36:20Zen
dc.date.available2016-02-23T16:36:20Zen
dc.date.issued2012-09en
dc.identifier.citationBelitsky, Jason M., Micah Z. Ellowitz, Diane Lye, and Alexander L. Kilbo. 2012. "Small molecule modulators of aggregation in synthetic melanin polymerizations." Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters 22(17): 5503-5507.en
dc.identifier.issn0960-894Xen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11282/597043en
dc.description.abstractThere are numerous potential applications for melanin-binding compounds, and new methods are of interest to identify melanin-binding agents. A portion of the polymerization to eumelanin, the black to brown pigment in humans, is thought to be supramolecular aggregation of nanoparticles derived from dihydroxyindoles. Starting with chloroquine, a known eumelanin-binding compound, the ability of small molecules to influence aggregation in synthetic eumelanin polymerizations was investigated. Twenty-eight compounds were tested, including pharmaceuticals, dyes, aromatics, and amines. Compounds that either accelerate or delay the appearance of macroscopic particles in synthetic eumelanin polymerizations were uncovered.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherElsevier for Pergamonen
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.bmcl.2012.07.027en
dc.relation.urlhttp://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0960894X12008943en
dc.subject.departmentChemistry and Biochemistryen_US
dc.titleSmall molecule modulators of aggregation in synthetic melanin polymerizationsen_US
dc.typeArticleen
dc.description.notesThis paper is dedicated to Professor J. Fraser Stoddart on the occasion of his 70th birthday.en_US
dc.identifier.journalBioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Lettersen
dc.subject.keywordMelaninen_US
dc.subject.keywordEumelaninen_US
dc.subject.keywordAggregationen_US
dc.subject.keywordChloroquineen_US
dc.subject.keywordCongo reden_US
dc.identifier.volume22en_US
dc.identifier.issue17en_US
dc.identifier.startpage5503en_US
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Lettersen
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