A Threat in the Computer: The Race Implicit Association Test as a Stereotype Threat Experience

Title:
A Threat in the Computer: The Race Implicit Association Test as a Stereotype Threat Experience
Authors:
Frantz, Cynthia M. ( 0000-0001-9303-3052 ) ; Cuddy, Amy J. C.; Burnett, Molly; Ray, Heidi; Hart, Allen
Abstract:
Three experiments test whether the threat of appearing racist leads White participants to perform worse on the race Implicit Association Test (IAT) and whether self-affirmation can protect from this threat. Experiments 1 and 2 suggest that White participants show a stereotype threat effect when completing the race IAT, leading to stronger pro-White scores when the test is believed to be diagnostic of racism. This effect increases for domain-identified (highly motivated to control prejudice) participants (Experiment 2). In Experiment 3, self-affirmation inoculates participants against stereotype threat while taking the race IAT. These findings have methodological implications for use of the race IAT and theoretical implications concerning the malleability of automatic prejudice and the potential interpersonal effects of the fear of appearing racist.
Citation:
Frantz, Cynthia M., Amy J.C. Cuddy, Molly Burnett, et al. 2004. "A Threat in the Computer: The Race Implicit Association Test as a Stereotype Threat Experience." Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin 30(12): 1611-1624.
Publisher:
SAGE Publications for the Society for Personality and Social Psychology
DATE ISSUED:
2004-12-01
Department:
Psychology
Type:
Article
PUBLISHED VERSION:
10.1177/0146167204266650
Additional Links:
http://psp.sagepub.com/cgi/doi/10.1177/0146167204266650
PERMANENT LINK:
http://hdl.handle.net/11282/596656

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFrantz, Cynthia M.en
dc.contributor.authorCuddy, Amy J. C.en
dc.contributor.authorBurnett, Mollyen
dc.contributor.authorRay, Heidien
dc.contributor.authorHart, Allenen
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-18T15:19:41Zen
dc.date.available2016-02-18T15:19:41Zen
dc.date.issued2004-12-01en
dc.identifier.citationFrantz, Cynthia M., Amy J.C. Cuddy, Molly Burnett, et al. 2004. "A Threat in the Computer: The Race Implicit Association Test as a Stereotype Threat Experience." Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin 30(12): 1611-1624.en
dc.identifier.issn0146-1672en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11282/596656en
dc.description.abstractThree experiments test whether the threat of appearing racist leads White participants to perform worse on the race Implicit Association Test (IAT) and whether self-affirmation can protect from this threat. Experiments 1 and 2 suggest that White participants show a stereotype threat effect when completing the race IAT, leading to stronger pro-White scores when the test is believed to be diagnostic of racism. This effect increases for domain-identified (highly motivated to control prejudice) participants (Experiment 2). In Experiment 3, self-affirmation inoculates participants against stereotype threat while taking the race IAT. These findings have methodological implications for use of the race IAT and theoretical implications concerning the malleability of automatic prejudice and the potential interpersonal effects of the fear of appearing racist.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherSAGE Publications for the Society for Personality and Social Psychologyen
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0146167204266650en
dc.relation.urlhttp://psp.sagepub.com/cgi/doi/10.1177/0146167204266650en
dc.subject.departmentPsychologyen_US
dc.titleA Threat in the Computer: The Race Implicit Association Test as a Stereotype Threat Experienceen_US
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalPersonality and Social Psychology Bulletinen
dc.subject.keywordImplicit Association Testen_US
dc.subject.keywordStereotype threaten_US
dc.subject.keywordSelf-affirmationen_US
dc.subject.keywordImplicit racial attitudesen_US
dc.identifier.volume30en_US
dc.identifier.issue12en_US
dc.identifier.startpage1611en_US
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Personality and Social Psychology Bulletinen
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