I AM Being Fair: The Bias Blind Spot as a Stumbling Block to Seeing Both Sides

Title:
I AM Being Fair: The Bias Blind Spot as a Stumbling Block to Seeing Both Sides
Authors:
Frantz, Cynthia M. ( 0000-0001-9303-3052 )
Abstract:
Past research has demonstrated that people more readily recognize bias in others' perceptions than they do in their own. The current research demonstrates the tenacity of this effect in the context of interpersonal conflicts. In Study 1, participants assumed their own construals of conflict were fair and uninfluenced by affective preferences, whereas those disagreeing with them were seen as unfair and biased. In Study 2, participants were induced to exhibit a liking bias, yet still reported themselves uninfluenced by liking. In Study 3, participants received an explanation of the liking bias and were asked to correct for it. Despite heavy demand characteristics, they failed to do so. Together, these studies suggest that social perceivers are particularly blind to their own biases in conflict situations.
Citation:
Frantz, Cynthia M. 2006. "I AM Being Fair: The Bias Blind Spot as a Stumbling Block to Seeing Both Sides." Basic and Applied Social Psychology 28(2): 157-167.
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
DATE ISSUED:
2006-06
Department:
Psychology
Type:
Article
PUBLISHED VERSION:
10.1207/s15324834basp2802_5
Additional Links:
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1207/s15324834basp2802_5
PERMANENT LINK:
http://hdl.handle.net/11282/596621

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFrantz, Cynthia M.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-18T14:11:01Zen
dc.date.available2016-02-18T14:11:01Zen
dc.date.issued2006-06en
dc.identifier.citationFrantz, Cynthia M. 2006. "I AM Being Fair: The Bias Blind Spot as a Stumbling Block to Seeing Both Sides." Basic and Applied Social Psychology 28(2): 157-167.en
dc.identifier.issn0197-3533en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11282/596621en
dc.description.abstractPast research has demonstrated that people more readily recognize bias in others' perceptions than they do in their own. The current research demonstrates the tenacity of this effect in the context of interpersonal conflicts. In Study 1, participants assumed their own construals of conflict were fair and uninfluenced by affective preferences, whereas those disagreeing with them were seen as unfair and biased. In Study 2, participants were induced to exhibit a liking bias, yet still reported themselves uninfluenced by liking. In Study 3, participants received an explanation of the liking bias and were asked to correct for it. Despite heavy demand characteristics, they failed to do so. Together, these studies suggest that social perceivers are particularly blind to their own biases in conflict situations.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.identifier.doi10.1207/s15324834basp2802_5en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1207/s15324834basp2802_5en
dc.subject.departmentPsychologyen_US
dc.titleI AM Being Fair: The Bias Blind Spot as a Stumbling Block to Seeing Both Sidesen_US
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalBasic and Applied Social Psychologyen
dc.subject.keywordNaive theoriesen_US
dc.subject.keywordConflicten_US
dc.subject.keywordPerceptionsen_US
dc.subject.keywordPerspectiveen_US
dc.subject.keywordJudgmenten_US
dc.identifier.volume28en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.startpage157en_US
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Basic and Applied Social Psychologyen
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