Predation on Experimentally Deployed Molluscan Shells from Shelf to Slope Depths in a Tropical Carbonate Environment

Title:
Predation on Experimentally Deployed Molluscan Shells from Shelf to Slope Depths in a Tropical Carbonate Environment
Authors:
Walker, Sally E.; Parsons-Hubbard, Karla; Powell, Eric N.; Brett, Carlton E.
Abstract:
Predation was examined using experimentally deployed shells along two transects representing shallow shelf (15 to 30 m), outer shelf (70 m) and bathyal (100 m to 267 m) habitats in the Bahamas. Lethal breakage on experimentally tethered shells was not restricted to the shallow-shelf (! 30 m), but could occur to outer shelf (70 m) and upper slope (88 m) depths. However, significantly more shells were preyed on at shallow-shelf depths (less than or equal to30 m) than at deeper depths ( : 70 m) for both transects. Predation was not restricted to shelf sites (:5 70 m), and predator-induced damage, such as peeled shells or last whorl remnants, could be encountered to a depth of 195 m. However, significantly more predation occurred at shelf rather than slope ( ! 88 m) depths for both transects. Although the experimental shells were exotic species, they were preyed upon at differing frequencies depending upon transect location and depth. It appears that morphology alone may not account for the differences in predation. Long-term deployment (six years) of shells enhanced the likelihood of predation, but short term deployment (one or two years) did not. Molluscivorous predators in the Caribbean are highly diverse and are not restricted to the shallow shelf, but occur in outer shelf to slope settings. Therefore, evolutionary-ecological conclusions based on predation with depth should not be tied to a single site, to a few depths, or to a single predator, as habitat heterogeneity and patchiness in predator and prey distributions may vary.
Citation:
Walker, Sally E., Karla Parsons-Hubbard, Eric N. Powell, and Carlton E. Brett. 2002. "Predation on Experimentally Deployed Molluscan Shells from Shelf to Slope Depths in a Tropical Carbonate Environment." PALAIOS 17(2): 147-170.
Publisher:
Society for Sedimentary Geology
DATE ISSUED:
2002-04-01
Department:
Geology
Type:
Article
PUBLISHED VERSION:
10.1669/0883-1351(2002)017<0147:POEDMS>2.0.CO;2
Additional Links:
http://palaios.sepmonline.org/cgi/doi/10.1669/0883-1351(2002)017%3C0147:POEDMS%3E2.0.CO;2
PERMANENT LINK:
http://hdl.handle.net/11282/596034

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWalker, Sally E.en
dc.contributor.authorParsons-Hubbard, Karlaen
dc.contributor.authorPowell, Eric N.en
dc.contributor.authorBrett, Carlton E.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-10T13:50:22Zen
dc.date.available2016-02-10T13:50:22Zen
dc.date.issued2002-04-01en
dc.identifier.citationWalker, Sally E., Karla Parsons-Hubbard, Eric N. Powell, and Carlton E. Brett. 2002. "Predation on Experimentally Deployed Molluscan Shells from Shelf to Slope Depths in a Tropical Carbonate Environment." PALAIOS 17(2): 147-170.en
dc.identifier.issn0883-1351en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11282/596034en
dc.description.abstractPredation was examined using experimentally deployed shells along two transects representing shallow shelf (15 to 30 m), outer shelf (70 m) and bathyal (100 m to 267 m) habitats in the Bahamas. Lethal breakage on experimentally tethered shells was not restricted to the shallow-shelf (! 30 m), but could occur to outer shelf (70 m) and upper slope (88 m) depths. However, significantly more shells were preyed on at shallow-shelf depths (less than or equal to30 m) than at deeper depths ( : 70 m) for both transects. Predation was not restricted to shelf sites (:5 70 m), and predator-induced damage, such as peeled shells or last whorl remnants, could be encountered to a depth of 195 m. However, significantly more predation occurred at shelf rather than slope ( ! 88 m) depths for both transects. Although the experimental shells were exotic species, they were preyed upon at differing frequencies depending upon transect location and depth. It appears that morphology alone may not account for the differences in predation. Long-term deployment (six years) of shells enhanced the likelihood of predation, but short term deployment (one or two years) did not. Molluscivorous predators in the Caribbean are highly diverse and are not restricted to the shallow shelf, but occur in outer shelf to slope settings. Therefore, evolutionary-ecological conclusions based on predation with depth should not be tied to a single site, to a few depths, or to a single predator, as habitat heterogeneity and patchiness in predator and prey distributions may vary.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherSociety for Sedimentary Geologyen
dc.identifier.doi10.1669/0883-1351(2002)017<0147:POEDMS>2.0.CO;2en
dc.relation.urlhttp://palaios.sepmonline.org/cgi/doi/10.1669/0883-1351(2002)017%3C0147:POEDMS%3E2.0.CO;2en
dc.subject.departmentGeologyen_US
dc.titlePredation on Experimentally Deployed Molluscan Shells from Shelf to Slope Depths in a Tropical Carbonate Environmenten_US
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalPALAIOSen
dc.subject.keywordIntertidal community structureen_US
dc.subject.keywordMesozoic marine revolutionen_US
dc.subject.keywordGastropod shellen_US
dc.subject.keywordCrab predationen_US
dc.subject.keywordFossil recorden_US
dc.subject.keywordCaliforniaen_US
dc.subject.keywordSnailsen_US
dc.identifier.volume17en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.startpage147en_US
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to PALAIOSen
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