Evaluating the accuracy of alcohol expectancies relative to subjective response to alcohol

Title:
Evaluating the accuracy of alcohol expectancies relative to subjective response to alcohol
Authors:
Morean, Meghan E. ( 0000-0003-4865-1155 ) ; Corbin, William R.; Treat, Teresa A.
Abstract:
Introduction: Although limited in empirical support, Alcohol Expectancy (AE) theory posits that AEs may overestimate subjective response (SR) to the positive effects of alcohol, which, in turn, confers alcohol-related risk (e.g., Darkes & Goldman, 1993). The recent development of the Anticipated Effects of Alcohol Scale (AEAS; Morean, Corbin, & Treat, 2012) and the Subjective Effects of Alcohol Scale (SEAS; Morean, Corbin, & Treat, 2013) now permits direct AE-SR comparisons using psychometrically sound assessments designed for this purpose. Methods: We ran secondary data analyses (Morean et al., 2012, 2013) evaluating measurement invariance of AEs and SR; AE-SR relationships; the accuracy of AEs; and relations between AE-SR discrepancies and binge drinking, driving after drinking, and alcohol-related problems in a sample of 102 young adults (mean age 22.81 [2.25]; 74.5% male; 76.5% Caucasian) who consumed alcohol in a simulated bar setting (target blood alcohol level = .08 g/dL). Results: The AEAS and SEAS were scalar measurement invariant and that AEs generally overestimated SR (mean Cohen's d = .48). Relative to SR, inflated high arousal negative AEs (e.g., aggressive) were associated with frequent binge drinking and alcohol-related problems, whereas exaggerated low arousal negative AEs (e.g., woozy) served protective functions. As blood alcohol levels rose, inflated low arousal positive AEs (e.g., relaxed) and low arousal negative AEs (e.g., wobbly) were associated with less frequent driving after drinking. Conclusions: Challenging AE-SR discrepancies for high arousal effects may have utility in treatment and prevention efforts, whereas maintaining overestimates of low arousal effects may serve protective functions. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Citation:
Morean, M.E., W.R. Corbin, and T.A. Treat. 2015. "Evaluating the accuracy of alcohol expectancies relative to subjective response to alcohol." Addictive Behaviors 51: 197-203.
Publisher:
Elsevier
DATE ISSUED:
2015-12
Department:
Psychology
Type:
Article
PUBLISHED VERSION:
10.1016/j.addbeh.2015.07.027
PERMANENT LINK:
http://hdl.handle.net/11282/593460

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMorean, Meghan E.en
dc.contributor.authorCorbin, William R.en
dc.contributor.authorTreat, Teresa A.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-14T14:50:38Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-14T14:50:38Zen
dc.date.issued2015-12en
dc.identifier.citationMorean, M.E., W.R. Corbin, and T.A. Treat. 2015. "Evaluating the accuracy of alcohol expectancies relative to subjective response to alcohol." Addictive Behaviors 51: 197-203.en
dc.identifier.issn0306-4603en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11282/593460en
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Although limited in empirical support, Alcohol Expectancy (AE) theory posits that AEs may overestimate subjective response (SR) to the positive effects of alcohol, which, in turn, confers alcohol-related risk (e.g., Darkes & Goldman, 1993). The recent development of the Anticipated Effects of Alcohol Scale (AEAS; Morean, Corbin, & Treat, 2012) and the Subjective Effects of Alcohol Scale (SEAS; Morean, Corbin, & Treat, 2013) now permits direct AE-SR comparisons using psychometrically sound assessments designed for this purpose. Methods: We ran secondary data analyses (Morean et al., 2012, 2013) evaluating measurement invariance of AEs and SR; AE-SR relationships; the accuracy of AEs; and relations between AE-SR discrepancies and binge drinking, driving after drinking, and alcohol-related problems in a sample of 102 young adults (mean age 22.81 [2.25]; 74.5% male; 76.5% Caucasian) who consumed alcohol in a simulated bar setting (target blood alcohol level = .08 g/dL). Results: The AEAS and SEAS were scalar measurement invariant and that AEs generally overestimated SR (mean Cohen's d = .48). Relative to SR, inflated high arousal negative AEs (e.g., aggressive) were associated with frequent binge drinking and alcohol-related problems, whereas exaggerated low arousal negative AEs (e.g., woozy) served protective functions. As blood alcohol levels rose, inflated low arousal positive AEs (e.g., relaxed) and low arousal negative AEs (e.g., wobbly) were associated with less frequent driving after drinking. Conclusions: Challenging AE-SR discrepancies for high arousal effects may have utility in treatment and prevention efforts, whereas maintaining overestimates of low arousal effects may serve protective functions. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.addbeh.2015.07.027en
dc.subject.departmentPsychologyen_US
dc.titleEvaluating the accuracy of alcohol expectancies relative to subjective response to alcoholen_US
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalAddictive Behaviorsen
dc.identifier.volume51en_US
dc.identifier.startpage197en_US
All Items in The Five Colleges of Ohio Digital Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.