Remembering and Forgetting Suger at Saint-Denis, 1151-1534: An abbot’s reputation between memory and history

Title:
Remembering and Forgetting Suger at Saint-Denis, 1151-1534: An abbot’s reputation between memory and history
Authors:
Inglis, Erik
Abstract:
A passage from the Grandes Chroniques de France claims that the rebuilding of the nave of Saint-Denis in the 1230s marked the first new construction there since Dagobert built the church in the seventh century. The text’s omission of Abbot Suger’s famous campaigns in the 1130s and 1140s, which the abbot himself did so much to commemorate, provides an opportunity to assess Suger’s reception, to see if and how his hope to be remembered was realized in the centuries after his death. Reviewing the evidence from Saint-Denis’ chronicles and inventories, we find that the years around 1300 marked a turning point in Suger’s posthumous reputation. Some of this is probably the inevitable result of the passage of time, as the living memory of Suger died; it also results from the desire to celebrate the ambitious construction at the abbey in the thirteenth century. The article concludes by comparing the memory of Suger with that of other celebrated patrons, including Bernward of Hildesheim, Louis IX, and Anquetil of Moissac.
Citation:
Inglis, Erik. 2015. "Remembering and Forgetting Suger at Saint-Denis, 1151–1534: An Abbot’s Reputation between Memory and History." Gesta 54(2): 219-243.
Publisher:
The University of Chicago Press on behalf of the International Center of Medieval Art
DATE ISSUED:
2015
Department:
Art
Type:
Article
PUBLISHED VERSION:
10.1086/681955
PERMANENT LINK:
http://hdl.handle.net/11282/582392

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorInglis, Eriken
dc.date.accessioned2015-11-19T16:43:26Zen
dc.date.available2015-11-19T16:43:26Zen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.identifier.citationInglis, Erik. 2015. "Remembering and Forgetting Suger at Saint-Denis, 1151–1534: An Abbot’s Reputation between Memory and History." Gesta 54(2): 219-243.en
dc.identifier.issn0016-920Xen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11282/582392en
dc.description.abstractA passage from the Grandes Chroniques de France claims that the rebuilding of the nave of Saint-Denis in the 1230s marked the first new construction there since Dagobert built the church in the seventh century. The text’s omission of Abbot Suger’s famous campaigns in the 1130s and 1140s, which the abbot himself did so much to commemorate, provides an opportunity to assess Suger’s reception, to see if and how his hope to be remembered was realized in the centuries after his death. Reviewing the evidence from Saint-Denis’ chronicles and inventories, we find that the years around 1300 marked a turning point in Suger’s posthumous reputation. Some of this is probably the inevitable result of the passage of time, as the living memory of Suger died; it also results from the desire to celebrate the ambitious construction at the abbey in the thirteenth century. The article concludes by comparing the memory of Suger with that of other celebrated patrons, including Bernward of Hildesheim, Louis IX, and Anquetil of Moissac.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Chicago Press on behalf of the International Center of Medieval Arten
dc.identifier.doi10.1086/681955en
dc.subject.departmentArten_US
dc.titleRemembering and Forgetting Suger at Saint-Denis, 1151-1534: An abbot’s reputation between memory and historyen_US
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalGestaen
dc.identifier.volume54en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.startpage219en_US
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