Aid for Gays: The Moral and the Material in 'African Homophobia’

Title:
Aid for Gays: The Moral and the Material in 'African Homophobia’
Authors:
Biruk, Crystal
Abstract:
In recent years, ‘African homophobia’ has become a spectacle on the global stage, making Africa into a pre-modern site of anti-gay sentiment in need of Western intervention. This article suggests that ‘homophobia’ in post-2009 Malawi is an idiom through which multiple actors negotiate anxieties around governance and moral and economic dependency. I illustrate the material conditions that brought about social imaginaries of inclusion and exclusion – partially expressed through homophobic discourse – in Malawi. The article analyses the cascade of events that led to a moment of political and economic crisis in mid-2011, with special focus on how a 2009 sodomy case made homophobia available as a new genre of social commentary. Employing discourse analysis of newspaper articles, political speeches, the proceedings of a sodomy case, and discussions about men who have sex with men (MSM) as an HIV risk group, I show how African homophobia takes form via interested deployments of ‘cultural’ rhetoric toward competing ends. This article lends a comparative case st
Citation:
Biruk, Crystal. 2014. “Aid for Gays: The Moral and Material in 'African Homophobia.’” Journal of Modern African Studies 52(3): 447-473.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
DATE ISSUED:
2014
Department:
Anthropology
Type:
Article
PUBLISHED VERSION:
10.1017/S0022278X14000226
PERMANENT LINK:
http://hdl.handle.net/11282/566890

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBiruk, Crystalen
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-13T10:36:20Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-13T10:36:20Zen
dc.date.issued2014en
dc.identifier.citationBiruk, Crystal. 2014. “Aid for Gays: The Moral and Material in 'African Homophobia.’” Journal of Modern African Studies 52(3): 447-473.en
dc.identifier.issn0022-278Xen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11282/566890en
dc.description.abstractIn recent years, ‘African homophobia’ has become a spectacle on the global stage, making Africa into a pre-modern site of anti-gay sentiment in need of Western intervention. This article suggests that ‘homophobia’ in post-2009 Malawi is an idiom through which multiple actors negotiate anxieties around governance and moral and economic dependency. I illustrate the material conditions that brought about social imaginaries of inclusion and exclusion – partially expressed through homophobic discourse – in Malawi. The article analyses the cascade of events that led to a moment of political and economic crisis in mid-2011, with special focus on how a 2009 sodomy case made homophobia available as a new genre of social commentary. Employing discourse analysis of newspaper articles, political speeches, the proceedings of a sodomy case, and discussions about men who have sex with men (MSM) as an HIV risk group, I show how African homophobia takes form via interested deployments of ‘cultural’ rhetoric toward competing ends. This article lends a comparative case sten
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherCambridge University Pressen
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0022278X14000226en
dc.subject.departmentAnthropologyen
dc.titleAid for Gays: The Moral and the Material in 'African Homophobia’en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Modern African Studiesen
dc.subject.keywordHuman rightsen_US
dc.subject.keywordSouthern Africaen_US
dc.subject.keywordHealthen_US
dc.subject.keywordDiscoursesen_US
dc.subject.keywordPoliticsen_US
dc.subject.keywordHomosexualityen_US
dc.subject.keywordMozambiqueen_US
dc.subject.keywordSexualityen_US
dc.identifier.volume52en
dc.identifier.issue3en
dc.identifier.startpage447en
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