What's in a name? Distinguishing between routine disclosure and self-disclosure

Title:
What's in a name? Distinguishing between routine disclosure and self-disclosure
Authors:
Tilton-Weaver, Lauree C.; Marshall, Sheila K.; Darling, Nancy ( 0000-0003-3271-8132 )
Abstract:
A lack of specificity between two types of disclosure has emerged in research on adolescents’ relationship and communication with their parents. Researchers are obscuring the distinctions between self-disclosure and routine disclosure (i.e., disclosure of their whereabouts and activities to parents). In this article, we describe where the problems have arisen and then outline the conceptual differences between the two. Illustrations of how the two types of disclosure overlap or co-occur are provided to demonstrate how fruitful areas for future research can emerge from attending to the distinctions between these two constructs.
Citation:
Tilton-Weaver, L., S. Marshall, and N. Darling. December 2014.  “What's in a name? Distinguishing between routine disclosure and self-disclosure.” Journal of Research on Adolescence 24(4): 551-563.
Publisher:
Wiley for Society for Research on Adolescence
DATE ISSUED:
2014-12
Department:
Psychology
Type:
Article
PUBLISHED VERSION:
10.1111/jora.12090
PERMANENT LINK:
http://hdl.handle.net/11282/566833

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorTilton-Weaver, Lauree C.en
dc.contributor.authorMarshall, Sheila K.en
dc.contributor.authorDarling, Nancyen
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-13T10:35:08Zen
dc.date.available2015-08-13T10:35:08Zen
dc.date.issued2014-12en
dc.identifier.citationTilton-Weaver, L., S. Marshall, and N. Darling. December 2014.  “What's in a name? Distinguishing between routine disclosure and self-disclosure.” Journal of Research on Adolescence 24(4): 551-563.en
dc.identifier.issn1050-8392en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11282/566833en
dc.description.abstractA lack of specificity between two types of disclosure has emerged in research on adolescents’ relationship and communication with their parents. Researchers are obscuring the distinctions between self-disclosure and routine disclosure (i.e., disclosure of their whereabouts and activities to parents). In this article, we describe where the problems have arisen and then outline the conceptual differences between the two. Illustrations of how the two types of disclosure overlap or co-occur are provided to demonstrate how fruitful areas for future research can emerge from attending to the distinctions between these two constructs.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherWiley for Society for Research on Adolescenceen
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/jora.12090en
dc.subject.departmentPsychologyen
dc.titleWhat's in a name? Distinguishing between routine disclosure and self-disclosureen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Research on Adolescenceen
dc.subject.keywordPerceived parental knowledgeen_US
dc.subject.keywordAdolescenceen_US
dc.subject.keywordInformation-managementen_US
dc.subject.keywordClose relationshipsen_US
dc.subject.keywordMaternal knowledgeen_US
dc.subject.keywordFamilies--United Statesen_US
dc.subject.keywordPrivacy invasionen_US
dc.subject.keywordProblem behavioren_US
dc.identifier.volume24en
dc.identifier.issue4en
dc.identifier.startpage551en
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