Finding Lascar ‘Wilful Incendiarism’: British Ship-Burning Panic and Indian Maritime Labour in the Indian Ocean

Title:
Finding Lascar ‘Wilful Incendiarism’: British Ship-Burning Panic and Indian Maritime Labour in the Indian Ocean
Authors:
Fisher, Michael H.
Abstract:
From the 1790s to the 1850s, three dozen major merchant ships burned in India's important ports. Panic-stricken British shipowners, merchants and East India Company officials apprehended disruption of their intercontinental trade, so vital to the burgeoning British Empire. In all these cases, they accused Indian seamen (lascars) of selfish ship-burning. As a context, the lascars had, for centuries prior to European arrival in the Indian Ocean, worked collectively under their own petty officers. They and Indian recruiters in each port had long resisted colonial efforts to appropriate their maritime labour system. Britons used this half-century of alleged arson to finally impose British controls over lascar recruitment ashore and conditions of service aboard ships.
Citation:
Fisher, Michael H. 2012. "Finding Lascar ‘Wilful Incendiarism’: British Ship-Burning Panic and Indian Maritime Labour in the Indian Ocean." South Asia: Journal of South Asian Studies 35(3): 596-623.
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
DATE ISSUED:
2012-03
Department:
History
Type:
Article
PUBLISHED VERSION:
10.1080/00856401.2011.635590
PERMANENT LINK:
http://hdl.handle.net/11282/335831

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFisher, Michael H.en
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-19T14:14:34Z-
dc.date.available2014-11-19T14:14:34Z-
dc.date.issued2012-03-
dc.identifier.citationFisher, Michael H. 2012. "Finding Lascar ‘Wilful Incendiarism’: British Ship-Burning Panic and Indian Maritime Labour in the Indian Ocean." South Asia: Journal of South Asian Studies 35(3): 596-623.en
dc.identifier.issn0085-6401-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11282/335831-
dc.description.abstractFrom the 1790s to the 1850s, three dozen major merchant ships burned in India's important ports. Panic-stricken British shipowners, merchants and East India Company officials apprehended disruption of their intercontinental trade, so vital to the burgeoning British Empire. In all these cases, they accused Indian seamen (lascars) of selfish ship-burning. As a context, the lascars had, for centuries prior to European arrival in the Indian Ocean, worked collectively under their own petty officers. They and Indian recruiters in each port had long resisted colonial efforts to appropriate their maritime labour system. Britons used this half-century of alleged arson to finally impose British controls over lascar recruitment ashore and conditions of service aboard ships.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/00856401.2011.635590en_US
dc.subject.departmentHistoryen_US
dc.titleFinding Lascar ‘Wilful Incendiarism’: British Ship-Burning Panic and Indian Maritime Labour in the Indian Oceanen_US
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalSouth Asia: Journal of South Asian Studiesen
dc.identifier.volume35en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.startpage596en_US
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