Title:
Roots and the derivation
Authors:
Haugen, Jason D.; Siddiqi, Daniel
Abstract:
Contrary to recent work in Distributed Morphology adopting Early Root Insertion (the notion that Roots are present from the outset of the syntactic derivation), we argue that Late Insertion applies to Roots just like other morphemes. We support this conclusion with empirical evidence (Root suppletion and hyponymous direct objects in noun incorporation and related constructions) and conceptual considerations (including the beneficial obviation of readjustment operations and the possibility that narrow syntax is universal). Additional data (Latin semideponent verbs) allow us to recast Embick’s (2000) licensing analysis of Latin deponent verbs as a further argument for Late Root Insertion.
Citation:
Haugen, Jason D. and Daniel Siddiqi. 2013. “Roots and the derivation.” Linguistic Inquiry 44(3): 493-517.
Publisher:
Massachusetts Institute of Technology Press
DATE ISSUED:
2013
Department:
Anthropology
Type:
Article
PUBLISHED VERSION:
10.1162/LING_a_00136
PERMANENT LINK:
http://hdl.handle.net/11282/332563

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHaugen, Jason D.en
dc.contributor.authorSiddiqi, Danielen
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-09T12:05:06Zen
dc.date.available2014-10-09T12:05:06Zen
dc.date.issued2013en
dc.identifier.citationHaugen, Jason D. and Daniel Siddiqi. 2013. “Roots and the derivation.” Linguistic Inquiry 44(3): 493-517.en
dc.identifier.issn0024-3892en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11282/332563en
dc.description.abstractContrary to recent work in Distributed Morphology adopting Early Root Insertion (the notion that Roots are present from the outset of the syntactic derivation), we argue that Late Insertion applies to Roots just like other morphemes. We support this conclusion with empirical evidence (Root suppletion and hyponymous direct objects in noun incorporation and related constructions) and conceptual considerations (including the beneficial obviation of readjustment operations and the possibility that narrow syntax is universal). Additional data (Latin semideponent verbs) allow us to recast Embick’s (2000) licensing analysis of Latin deponent verbs as a further argument for Late Root Insertion.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technology Pressen
dc.identifier.doi10.1162/LING_a_00136en
dc.subject.departmentAnthropologyen
dc.titleRoots and the derivationen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalLinguistic Inquiryen
dc.subject.keywordRootsen
dc.subject.keywordLate insertionen
dc.subject.keywordRoot suppletionen
dc.subject.keywordReadjustment rulesen
dc.subject.keywordHyponymous objectsen
dc.subject.keywordDistributed morphologyen
dc.identifier.volume44en
dc.identifier.issue3en
dc.identifier.startpage493en
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