Children’s cross-ethnic relations in contemporary elementary schools: Concurrent and prospective associations between ethnic segregation and social status

Title:
Children’s cross-ethnic relations in contemporary elementary schools: Concurrent and prospective associations between ethnic segregation and social status
Authors:
Wilson, Travis; Rodkin, Philip C.
Abstract:
This study examined whether ethnic segregation is concurrently (fall) and prospectively (fall to spring) associated with social status among 4th- and 5th-grade African American and European American children (n = 713, ages 9–11 years). Segregation measures were (a) same-ethnicity favoritism in peer affiliations and (b) cross-ethnicity dislike. Social status measures were same- and cross-ethnicity peer nominations of acceptance, rejection, and cool. Among African Americans, fall segregation predicted declines in cross-ethnicity (European American) acceptance and same-ethnicity rejection, and increases in same-ethnicity acceptance and perceived coolness. For European American children, fall segregation predicted declines in cross-ethnicity (African American) acceptance and increases in cross-ethnicity rejection. Results indicate that segregation induces asymmetric changes in social status for African American and European American children.
Citation:
Wilson, T.M. and P.C. Rodkin. May/June 2013. “Children’s cross-ethnic relations in contemporary elementary schools: Concurrent and prospective associations between ethnic segregation and social status.” Child Development 84(3): 1081-1097.
Publisher:
Wiley on behalf of Society for Research in Child Development
DATE ISSUED:
2013
Department:
Psychology
Type:
Article
PUBLISHED VERSION:
10.1111/cdev.12020
PERMANENT LINK:
http://hdl.handle.net/11282/332482

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWilson, Travisen
dc.contributor.authorRodkin, Philip C.en
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-09T12:04:09Z-
dc.date.available2014-10-09T12:04:09Z-
dc.date.issued2013en
dc.identifier.citationWilson, T.M. and P.C. Rodkin. May/June 2013. “Children’s cross-ethnic relations in contemporary elementary schools: Concurrent and prospective associations between ethnic segregation and social status.” Child Development 84(3): 1081-1097.en
dc.identifier.issn0009-3920en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11282/332482-
dc.description.abstractThis study examined whether ethnic segregation is concurrently (fall) and prospectively (fall to spring) associated with social status among 4th- and 5th-grade African American and European American children (n = 713, ages 9–11 years). Segregation measures were (a) same-ethnicity favoritism in peer affiliations and (b) cross-ethnicity dislike. Social status measures were same- and cross-ethnicity peer nominations of acceptance, rejection, and cool. Among African Americans, fall segregation predicted declines in cross-ethnicity (European American) acceptance and same-ethnicity rejection, and increases in same-ethnicity acceptance and perceived coolness. For European American children, fall segregation predicted declines in cross-ethnicity (African American) acceptance and increases in cross-ethnicity rejection. Results indicate that segregation induces asymmetric changes in social status for African American and European American children.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherWiley on behalf of Society for Research in Child Developmenten
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/cdev.12020en
dc.subject.departmentPsychologyen
dc.titleChildren’s cross-ethnic relations in contemporary elementary schools: Concurrent and prospective associations between ethnic segregation and social statusen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalChild Developmenten
dc.identifier.volume84en
dc.identifier.issue3en
dc.identifier.startpage1081en
All Items in The Five Colleges of Ohio Digital Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.