Specificity of Control: The Case of Mexico’s Ejido Reform

Title:
Specificity of Control: The Case of Mexico’s Ejido Reform
Authors:
Pfutze, Tobias; Castañeda Dower, Paul
Abstract:
An important aspect of property rights is specificity, the ability of a third party to enforce rights. The empirical literature rarely isolates the effect of specificity because exogenous changes, due to land reforms, either simultaneously change both control and specificity or exclusively change control. We investigate the effect of specificity in the context of the 1992 Salinas land reforms in Mexico, which constitutionally changed individual control rights for all communal landholders but reserved changes to specificity for a subsequent voluntary land certification program. We are able to address selection into the program by taking advantage of the peculiarities in the certification process. Using agricultural production data from before and after the reform, we demonstrate that land certification significantly increases agricultural investments but only for investments directly affected by the changes in control. We explain the results using a simple model that shows how specificity can better coordinate landholders’ beliefs about the implementation of changes in control.
Citation:
Pfutze, Tobias and Paul Castañeda Dower. July 2013 “Specificity of Control: The Case of Mexico’s Ejido Reform.” Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization 91: 13-33.
Publisher:
Elsevier
DATE ISSUED:
2013
Department:
Economics
Type:
Article
PUBLISHED VERSION:
10.1016/j.jebo.2013.03.039
PERMANENT LINK:
http://hdl.handle.net/11282/332425

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPfutze, Tobiasen
dc.contributor.authorCastañeda Dower, Paulen
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-09T12:03:28Z-
dc.date.available2014-10-09T12:03:28Z-
dc.date.issued2013en
dc.identifier.citationPfutze, Tobias and Paul Castañeda Dower. July 2013 “Specificity of Control: The Case of Mexico’s Ejido Reform.” Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization 91: 13-33.en
dc.identifier.issn0167-2681en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11282/332425-
dc.description.abstractAn important aspect of property rights is specificity, the ability of a third party to enforce rights. The empirical literature rarely isolates the effect of specificity because exogenous changes, due to land reforms, either simultaneously change both control and specificity or exclusively change control. We investigate the effect of specificity in the context of the 1992 Salinas land reforms in Mexico, which constitutionally changed individual control rights for all communal landholders but reserved changes to specificity for a subsequent voluntary land certification program. We are able to address selection into the program by taking advantage of the peculiarities in the certification process. Using agricultural production data from before and after the reform, we demonstrate that land certification significantly increases agricultural investments but only for investments directly affected by the changes in control. We explain the results using a simple model that shows how specificity can better coordinate landholders’ beliefs about the implementation of changes in control.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jebo.2013.03.039en
dc.subject.departmentEconomicsen
dc.titleSpecificity of Control: The Case of Mexico’s Ejido Reformen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Economic Behavior & Organizationen
dc.subject.keywordProperty rightsen
dc.subject.keywordSpecificityen
dc.subject.keywordLand reformen
dc.subject.keywordMexicoen
dc.subject.keywordEjidoen
dc.identifier.volume91en
dc.identifier.startpage13en
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