Partner-specific adaptation in dialogue

Title:
Partner-specific adaptation in dialogue
Authors:
Brennan, Susan E.; Hanna, Joy E.
Abstract:
No one denies that people adapt what they say and how they interpret what is said to them, depending on their interactive partners. What is controversial is when and how they do so. Several psycholinguistics research programs have found what appear to be failures to adapt to partners in the early moments of processing and have used this evidence to argue for modularity in the language processing architecture, claiming that the system cannot take into account a partner’s distinct needs or knowledge early in processing. We review the evidence for both early and delayed partner-specific adaptations, and we identify some challenges and difficulties with interpreting this evidence. We then discuss new analyses from a previously published referential communication experiment (Metzing & Brennan, 2003) demonstrating that partner-specific effects need not occur late in processing. In contrast to Pickering and Garrod (2004) and Keysar, Barr, and Horton (1998b), we conclude that there is no good evidence that early processing has to be be “egocentric,”“dumb,” or encapsulated from social knowledge or common ground, but that under some circumstances, such as when one partner has made an attribution about another’s knowledge or needs, processing can be nimble enough to adapt quite early to a perspective different from one’s own.
Citation:
Brennan, Susan E., and Joy E. Hanna. 2009. "Partner-specific adaptation in dialogue." Topics In Cognitive Science 1: 274-291.
DATE ISSUED:
2009
Department:
Psychology
Type:
article
PUBLISHED VERSION:
10.1111/j.1756-8765.2009.01019.x
Notes:
Special Issue: Joint Action
PERMANENT LINK:
http://hdl.handle.net/11282/310625

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBrennan, Susan E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHanna, Joy E.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-23T16:37:02Zen
dc.date.available2013-12-23T16:37:02Zen
dc.date.issued2009en
dc.identifier.citationBrennan, Susan E., and Joy E. Hanna. 2009. "Partner-specific adaptation in dialogue." Topics In Cognitive Science 1: 274-291.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11282/310625en
dc.description.abstractNo one denies that people adapt what they say and how they interpret what is said to them, depending on their interactive partners. What is controversial is when and how they do so. Several psycholinguistics research programs have found what appear to be failures to adapt to partners in the early moments of processing and have used this evidence to argue for modularity in the language processing architecture, claiming that the system cannot take into account a partner’s distinct needs or knowledge early in processing. We review the evidence for both early and delayed partner-specific adaptations, and we identify some challenges and difficulties with interpreting this evidence. We then discuss new analyses from a previously published referential communication experiment (Metzing & Brennan, 2003) demonstrating that partner-specific effects need not occur late in processing. In contrast to Pickering and Garrod (2004) and Keysar, Barr, and Horton (1998b), we conclude that there is no good evidence that early processing has to be be “egocentric,”“dumb,” or encapsulated from social knowledge or common ground, but that under some circumstances, such as when one partner has made an attribution about another’s knowledge or needs, processing can be nimble enough to adapt quite early to a perspective different from one’s own.en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1756-8765.2009.01019.xen
dc.subject.departmentPsychologyen_US
dc.titlePartner-specific adaptation in dialogueen_US
dc.typearticleen_US
dc.description.notesSpecial Issue: Joint Actionen_US
dc.identifier.journalTopics In Cognitive Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.volume1en_US
dc.identifier.startpage274en_US
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