The Emergency of Climate Change: Why Are We Failing to Take Action?

Title:
The Emergency of Climate Change: Why Are We Failing to Take Action?
Authors:
Frantz, Cynthia M. ( 0000-0001-9303-3052 ) ; Mayer, F. Stephan
Abstract:
Latane and Darley developed a five-stage model to understand why people do and do not help other people in emergency situations. We extend their five-stage model to explore why people do and do not take action against climate change. We identify the factors that make climate change difficult to notice and ambiguous as an emergency; we explore barriers to taking responsibility for action; and we discuss the issues of efficacy and costs versus benefits that make action unlikely. The resulting analysis is useful on two levels. For educators and policy makers, the model suggests the most efficacious approaches to galvanizing action among U.S. citizens. For social scientists, the model provides a valuable framework for integrating research from diverse areas of psychology and suggests fruitful avenues for future empirical research.
Citation:
Frantz, Cindy McPherson, and F. S. Mayer. 2009. "The Emergency of Climate Change: Why Are We Failing to Take Action?" Analysis Of Social Issues And Public Policy 9(1): 205-222.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell
DATE ISSUED:
2009
Department:
Psychology
Type:
article
PUBLISHED VERSION:
10.1111/j.1530-2415.2009.01180.x
PERMANENT LINK:
http://hdl.handle.net/11282/310530

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFrantz, Cynthia M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMayer, F. Stephanen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-23T16:35:02Zen
dc.date.available2013-12-23T16:35:02Zen
dc.date.issued2009en
dc.identifier.citationFrantz, Cindy McPherson, and F. S. Mayer. 2009. "The Emergency of Climate Change: Why Are We Failing to Take Action?" Analysis Of Social Issues And Public Policy 9(1): 205-222.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1529-7489en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11282/310530en
dc.description.abstractLatane and Darley developed a five-stage model to understand why people do and do not help other people in emergency situations. We extend their five-stage model to explore why people do and do not take action against climate change. We identify the factors that make climate change difficult to notice and ambiguous as an emergency; we explore barriers to taking responsibility for action; and we discuss the issues of efficacy and costs versus benefits that make action unlikely. The resulting analysis is useful on two levels. For educators and policy makers, the model suggests the most efficacious approaches to galvanizing action among U.S. citizens. For social scientists, the model provides a valuable framework for integrating research from diverse areas of psychology and suggests fruitful avenues for future empirical research.en_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwellen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1530-2415.2009.01180.xen
dc.subject.departmentPsychologyen_US
dc.titleThe Emergency of Climate Change: Why Are We Failing to Take Action?en_US
dc.typearticleen_US
dc.identifier.journalAnalysis Of Social Issues And Public Policyen_US
dc.identifier.volume9en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.startpage205en_US
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