Promiscuity drives sexual selection in a socially monogamous bird

Title:
Promiscuity drives sexual selection in a socially monogamous bird
Authors:
Webster, Michael S.; Tarvin, Keith A.; Tuttle, Elaina M.; Pruett-Jones, Stephen
Abstract:
Many socially monogamous species paradoxically show signs of strong sexual selection, suggesting cryptic sources of sexual competition among males. Darwin argued that sexual selection could operate in monogamous systems if breeding sex ratios are biased or if some males attract highly fecund females. Alternatively, sexual selection might result from promiscuous copulations outside the pair bond, although several recent studies have cast doubt on this possibility, in particular by showing that variance in apparent male reproductive success (number of social young) differs little from variance in actual male reproductive success (number of young sired). Our results from a long-term study of the socially monogamous splendid fairy-wren (Malurus splendens) demonstrate that such comparisons are misleading and do not adequately assess the effects of extra-pair paternity (EPP). By partitioning the opportunity for selection and calculating Bateman gradients, we show that EPP has a strong effect on male annual and lifetime fitness, whereas other proposed mechanisms of sexual selection do not. Thus, EPP drives sexual selection in this, and possibly other, socially monogamous species.
Citation:
Webster, M. S., K. A. Tarvin, E. M. Tuttle, and S. Pruett-Jones. 2007. "Promiscuity drives sexual selection in a socially monogamous bird." Evolution 61(9): 2205-2211.
Publisher:
Wiley for the Society for the Study of Evolution (SSE)
DATE ISSUED:
2007
Department:
Biology
Type:
article
PUBLISHED VERSION:
10.1111/j.1558-5646.2007.00208.x
PERMANENT LINK:
http://hdl.handle.net/11282/310330

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWebster, Michael S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTarvin, Keith A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTuttle, Elaina M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPruett-Jones, Stephenen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-23T16:30:42Z-
dc.date.available2013-12-23T16:30:42Z-
dc.date.issued2007en
dc.identifier.citationWebster, M. S., K. A. Tarvin, E. M. Tuttle, and S. Pruett-Jones. 2007. "Promiscuity drives sexual selection in a socially monogamous bird." Evolution 61(9): 2205-2211.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0014-3820en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11282/310330-
dc.description.abstractMany socially monogamous species paradoxically show signs of strong sexual selection, suggesting cryptic sources of sexual competition among males. Darwin argued that sexual selection could operate in monogamous systems if breeding sex ratios are biased or if some males attract highly fecund females. Alternatively, sexual selection might result from promiscuous copulations outside the pair bond, although several recent studies have cast doubt on this possibility, in particular by showing that variance in apparent male reproductive success (number of social young) differs little from variance in actual male reproductive success (number of young sired). Our results from a long-term study of the socially monogamous splendid fairy-wren (Malurus splendens) demonstrate that such comparisons are misleading and do not adequately assess the effects of extra-pair paternity (EPP). By partitioning the opportunity for selection and calculating Bateman gradients, we show that EPP has a strong effect on male annual and lifetime fitness, whereas other proposed mechanisms of sexual selection do not. Thus, EPP drives sexual selection in this, and possibly other, socially monogamous species.en_US
dc.publisherWiley for the Society for the Study of Evolution (SSE)en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1558-5646.2007.00208.x-
dc.subject.departmentBiologyen_US
dc.titlePromiscuity drives sexual selection in a socially monogamous birden_US
dc.typearticleen_US
dc.identifier.journalEvolutionen_US
dc.identifier.volume61en_US
dc.identifier.issue9en_US
dc.identifier.startpage2205en_US
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