The Wilsonian Challenge to International Law

Title:
The Wilsonian Challenge to International Law
Authors:
Smith, Leonard V.
Abstract:
After the Great War, Woodrow Wilson challenged the foundations of international law based on fully sovereign states. 'Wilsonianism' as elaborated in the Fourteen Points, and in other speeches, rested on a logic that made a universalized liberal individual the locus of sovereignty in the new world order. The truly radical implications of Wilsonianism had no sterner critic than Robert Lansing, Wilson's secretary of state and one of the founders of the American Journal of International Law. Lansing held tenaciously to a positivist paradigm of international law as it had evolved by the early twentieth century. This article reconsiders the conflict between Wilson and Lansing not so much as a duel between individuals as a duel between conflicting conceptions of sovereignty and the purpose of international law in the new world order.
Citation:
Smith, Leonard V. 2011. "The Wilsonian Challenge to International Law." The Journal of the History of International Law 13: 179-208.
Publisher:
Brill Academic Publishers
DATE ISSUED:
2011
Department:
History
Type:
article
PUBLISHED VERSION:
10.1163/157180511X552081
PERMANENT LINK:
http://hdl.handle.net/11282/310156

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Leonard V.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-23T16:26:58Zen
dc.date.available2013-12-23T16:26:58Zen
dc.date.issued2011en
dc.identifier.citationSmith, Leonard V. 2011. "The Wilsonian Challenge to International Law." The Journal of the History of International Law 13: 179-208.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1388-199Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11282/310156en
dc.description.abstractAfter the Great War, Woodrow Wilson challenged the foundations of international law based on fully sovereign states. 'Wilsonianism' as elaborated in the Fourteen Points, and in other speeches, rested on a logic that made a universalized liberal individual the locus of sovereignty in the new world order. The truly radical implications of Wilsonianism had no sterner critic than Robert Lansing, Wilson's secretary of state and one of the founders of the American Journal of International Law. Lansing held tenaciously to a positivist paradigm of international law as it had evolved by the early twentieth century. This article reconsiders the conflict between Wilson and Lansing not so much as a duel between individuals as a duel between conflicting conceptions of sovereignty and the purpose of international law in the new world order.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherBrill Academic Publishersen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1163/157180511X552081en
dc.subject.departmentHistoryen_US
dc.titleThe Wilsonian Challenge to International Lawen_US
dc.typearticleen_US
dc.identifier.journalJournal of the History of International Lawen_US
dc.subject.keywordInternational law--Historyen_US
dc.subject.keywordInternational law--Philosophyen_US
dc.subject.keywordSovereignty (Political science)en_US
dc.subject.keywordAutonomyen_US
dc.subject.keywordWorld War, 1914-1918en_US
dc.subject.keywordIntellectual lifeen_US
dc.subject.keywordInfluenceen_US
dc.subject.keywordUnited States--Politics and government--1913-1921en_US
dc.subject.keyword20th centuryen_US
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