The contradictions of French industrial relations reform

Title:
The contradictions of French industrial relations reform
Authors:
Howell, Chris
Abstract:
This article explores the impact of the 1982-83 industrial relations reforms known as the lois Auroux of the Socialist government in France. It argues that, contrary to the goals of the Socialists, this reform package failed to stimulate regular collective bargaining between employers and trade unions. Nevertheless, the reforms did have an important impact on French industrial relations. In the context of economic crisis and chronically weakened trade unions, a secondary component of the reform package came to the fore. This component, shorn of its radical, anticapitalist elements, shared a common ideological heritage with the autogestionnaire, or self-management, current of the Socialist Party, which had been briefly popular in the 1970s. The result of the application of this legislation in the mid 1980s was to encourage a decentralized, firm-based, "micro-corporatist" form of industrial relations which fit well with the dominant managerial emphasis upon flexibility in the workplace.
Citation:
Howell, Chris. "The Contradictions of French Industrial Relations Reform." Comparative Politics 24:2 (January 1992), pp. 181-197.
Publisher:
The City University of New York
DATE ISSUED:
1992-01
Department:
Politics
Type:
article
PUBLISHED VERSION:
10.2307/422277
PERMANENT LINK:
http://hdl.handle.net/11282/310107

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHowell, Chrisen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-23T16:25:31Z-
dc.date.available2013-12-23T16:25:31Z-
dc.date.issued1992-01en
dc.identifier.citationHowell, Chris. "The Contradictions of French Industrial Relations Reform." Comparative Politics 24:2 (January 1992), pp. 181-197.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0010-4159en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11282/310107-
dc.description.abstractThis article explores the impact of the 1982-83 industrial relations reforms known as the lois Auroux of the Socialist government in France. It argues that, contrary to the goals of the Socialists, this reform package failed to stimulate regular collective bargaining between employers and trade unions. Nevertheless, the reforms did have an important impact on French industrial relations. In the context of economic crisis and chronically weakened trade unions, a secondary component of the reform package came to the fore. This component, shorn of its radical, anticapitalist elements, shared a common ideological heritage with the autogestionnaire, or self-management, current of the Socialist Party, which had been briefly popular in the 1970s. The result of the application of this legislation in the mid 1980s was to encourage a decentralized, firm-based, "micro-corporatist" form of industrial relations which fit well with the dominant managerial emphasis upon flexibility in the workplace.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe City University of New Yorken_US
dc.identifier.doi10.2307/422277-
dc.subject.departmentPoliticsen_US
dc.titleThe contradictions of French industrial relations reformen_US
dc.typearticleen_US
dc.identifier.journalComparative Politicsen_US
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