Writing The Smile: Language Ideologies In, And Through, Sign Language Scripts

Title:
Writing The Smile: Language Ideologies In, And Through, Sign Language Scripts
Authors:
Hoffmann-Dilloway, Erika
Abstract:
This article explores the relationship between language ideology and script by detailing an emerging set of practices for writing sign languages. Though sign languages have often been considered un-writable, signers worldwide are increasingly producing written sign language texts using Sutton SignWriting (SW), a writing system originally developed for dance notation. After comparing SW to Stokoe Notation, a sign language script developed by a prominent sign language linguist, this article draws on texts produced by SW users, and the metalinguistic discussion of these texts on an email listserve, to demonstrate that use of SW allows its users to articulate and challenge dominant, and often tacit, ideologies about the nature of language and writing.
Citation:
Hoffmann-Dilloway, Erika. 2011. "Writing The Smile: Language Ideologies In, And Through, Sign Language Scripts." Language & Communication 31(4): 345-355.
Publisher:
Elsevier
DATE ISSUED:
2011-10
Department:
Anthropology
Type:
article
PUBLISHED VERSION:
10.1016/j.langcom.2011.05.008
PERMANENT LINK:
http://hdl.handle.net/11282/310086

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHoffmann-Dilloway, Erikaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-23T16:24:59Z-
dc.date.available2013-12-23T16:24:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10en
dc.identifier.citationHoffmann-Dilloway, Erika. 2011. "Writing The Smile: Language Ideologies In, And Through, Sign Language Scripts." Language & Communication 31(4): 345-355.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0271-5309en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11282/310086-
dc.description.abstractThis article explores the relationship between language ideology and script by detailing an emerging set of practices for writing sign languages. Though sign languages have often been considered un-writable, signers worldwide are increasingly producing written sign language texts using Sutton SignWriting (SW), a writing system originally developed for dance notation. After comparing SW to Stokoe Notation, a sign language script developed by a prominent sign language linguist, this article draws on texts produced by SW users, and the metalinguistic discussion of these texts on an email listserve, to demonstrate that use of SW allows its users to articulate and challenge dominant, and often tacit, ideologies about the nature of language and writing.en_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.langcom.2011.05.008-
dc.subject.departmentAnthropologyen_US
dc.titleWriting The Smile: Language Ideologies In, And Through, Sign Language Scriptsen_US
dc.typearticleen_US
dc.identifier.journalLanguage & Communicationen_US
dc.subject.keywordSigned languagesen_US
dc.subject.keywordWriting systemsen_US
dc.subject.keywordLanguage ideologiesen_US
dc.identifier.volume31en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.startpage345en_US
All Items in The Five Colleges of Ohio Digital Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.