What Subcortical-cortical Relationships Tell Us About Processing Speech In Noise

Title:
What Subcortical-cortical Relationships Tell Us About Processing Speech In Noise
Authors:
Parbery-Clark, Alexandra; Marmel, Frederic; Bair, Julia; Kraus, Nina
Abstract:
To advance our understanding of the biological basis of speech-in-noise perception, we investigated the effects of background noise on both subcortical- and cortical-evoked responses, and the relationships between them, in normal hearing young adults. The addition of background noise modulated subcortical and cortical response morphology. In noise, subcortical responses were later, smaller in amplitude and demonstrated decreased neural precision in encoding the speech sound. Cortical responses were also delayed by noise, yet the amplitudes of the major peaks (N1, P2) were affected differently, with N1 increasing and P2 decreasing. Relationships between neural measures and speech-in-noise ability were identified, with earlier subcortical responses, higher subcortical response fidelity and greater cortical N1 response magnitude all relating to better speech-in-noise perception. Furthermore, it was only with the addition of background noise that relationships between subcortical and cortical encoding of speech and the behavioral measures of speech in noise emerged. Results illustrate that human brainstem responses and N1 cortical response amplitude reflect coordinated processes with regards to the perception of speech in noise, thereby acting as a functional index of speech-in-noise perception.
Citation:
Parbery-Clark, Alexandra, Frederic Marmel, Julia Bair, and Nina Kraus. 2011. "What Subcortical-cortical Relationships Tell Us About Processing Speech In Noise." European Journal Of Neuroscience 33(3): 549-557.
Publisher:
Blackwell Publishing
DATE ISSUED:
2011-02
Department:
Neuroscience
Type:
article
PUBLISHED VERSION:
10.1111/j.1460-9568.2010.07546.x
PERMANENT LINK:
http://hdl.handle.net/11282/310068

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorParbery-Clark, Alexandraen_US
dc.contributor.authorMarmel, Fredericen_US
dc.contributor.authorBair, Juliaen_US
dc.contributor.authorKraus, Ninaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-23T16:24:33Z-
dc.date.available2013-12-23T16:24:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-02en
dc.identifier.citationParbery-Clark, Alexandra, Frederic Marmel, Julia Bair, and Nina Kraus. 2011. "What Subcortical-cortical Relationships Tell Us About Processing Speech In Noise." European Journal Of Neuroscience 33(3): 549-557.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0953-816Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11282/310068-
dc.description.abstractTo advance our understanding of the biological basis of speech-in-noise perception, we investigated the effects of background noise on both subcortical- and cortical-evoked responses, and the relationships between them, in normal hearing young adults. The addition of background noise modulated subcortical and cortical response morphology. In noise, subcortical responses were later, smaller in amplitude and demonstrated decreased neural precision in encoding the speech sound. Cortical responses were also delayed by noise, yet the amplitudes of the major peaks (N1, P2) were affected differently, with N1 increasing and P2 decreasing. Relationships between neural measures and speech-in-noise ability were identified, with earlier subcortical responses, higher subcortical response fidelity and greater cortical N1 response magnitude all relating to better speech-in-noise perception. Furthermore, it was only with the addition of background noise that relationships between subcortical and cortical encoding of speech and the behavioral measures of speech in noise emerged. Results illustrate that human brainstem responses and N1 cortical response amplitude reflect coordinated processes with regards to the perception of speech in noise, thereby acting as a functional index of speech-in-noise perception.en_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishingen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1460-9568.2010.07546.x-
dc.subject.departmentNeuroscienceen_US
dc.titleWhat Subcortical-cortical Relationships Tell Us About Processing Speech In Noiseen_US
dc.typearticleen_US
dc.identifier.journalEuropean Journal Of Neuroscienceen_US
dc.subject.keywordAuditory brainstem responseen_US
dc.subject.keywordCortical auditory-evoked potentialsen_US
dc.subject.keywordN1en_US
dc.subject.keywordSpeech in noiseen_US
dc.identifier.volume33en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.startpage549en_US
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