Baguettes, Berets And Burning Cars: The 2005 Riots And The Question Of Race In Contemporary France

Title:
Baguettes, Berets And Burning Cars: The 2005 Riots And The Question Of Race In Contemporary France
Authors:
Murphy, John P.
Abstract:
Following the unprecedented destruction witnessed during the 2005 youth riots in France, some social commentators have suggested that the young offenders, many of whom were of immigrant descent, were tired of France's colour-blind rhetoric and were now demanding recognition of their minority status, much like some groups in the United States. However, little scholarly work has captured in any systematic way the perception of such young people. In an effort to illuminate their views, this paper draws on 12 months of ethnographic field research, beginning in September 2005, among young people, both of immigrant ancestry and 'Franco-French', living in the housing projects of a medium-sized French city. Noting that markers associated with class distinctions were accepted by youth as a valid form of diversity but ones having to do with race were not, I argue that these young people are just as committed to republican values as anyone else in France. Facile comparison between the American and French contexts is apt to be more misleading than helpful.
Citation:
Murphy, John P. 2011. "Baguettes, Berets And Burning Cars: The 2005 Riots And The Question Of Race In Contemporary France." French Cultural Studies 22(1): 33-49.
Publisher:
Sage Publications
DATE ISSUED:
2011-02
Department:
French and Italian
Type:
article
PUBLISHED VERSION:
10.1177/0957155810386678
PERMANENT LINK:
http://hdl.handle.net/11282/310056

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, John P.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-23T16:24:18Zen
dc.date.available2013-12-23T16:24:18Zen
dc.date.issued2011-02en
dc.identifier.citationMurphy, John P. 2011. "Baguettes, Berets And Burning Cars: The 2005 Riots And The Question Of Race In Contemporary France." French Cultural Studies 22(1): 33-49.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0957-1558en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11282/310056en
dc.description.abstractFollowing the unprecedented destruction witnessed during the 2005 youth riots in France, some social commentators have suggested that the young offenders, many of whom were of immigrant descent, were tired of France's colour-blind rhetoric and were now demanding recognition of their minority status, much like some groups in the United States. However, little scholarly work has captured in any systematic way the perception of such young people. In an effort to illuminate their views, this paper draws on 12 months of ethnographic field research, beginning in September 2005, among young people, both of immigrant ancestry and 'Franco-French', living in the housing projects of a medium-sized French city. Noting that markers associated with class distinctions were accepted by youth as a valid form of diversity but ones having to do with race were not, I argue that these young people are just as committed to republican values as anyone else in France. Facile comparison between the American and French contexts is apt to be more misleading than helpful.en_US
dc.publisherSage Publicationsen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0957155810386678en
dc.subject.departmentFrench and Italianen_US
dc.titleBaguettes, Berets And Burning Cars: The 2005 Riots And The Question Of Race In Contemporary Franceen_US
dc.typearticleen_US
dc.identifier.journalFrench Cultural Studiesen_US
dc.subject.keywordRiots--France--Paris--History--21st centuryen_US
dc.subject.keywordEthnicityen_US
dc.subject.keywordFranceen_US
dc.subject.keywordImmigrationen_US
dc.subject.keywordMinority groupsen_US
dc.subject.keywordRaceen_US
dc.subject.keywordSocial classen_US
dc.subject.keywordYouthen_US
dc.identifier.volume22en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.startpage33en_US
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