Title:
Pluralism, Religion, and Secularism
Authors:
Yinger, J. Milton
Abstract:
Disagreements over definitions and consequent difficulties in precise measurement have obscured the study of the relationships among pluralism, religion, and secularism. But the importance of those relationships requires that we attempt to explore them. An emphasis on pluralism, it is suggested, supports religious freedom and tolerance, but it may also support rigidity in religious traditions. Defense of separate religious communities may transfer questions of social integration to secular institutions that are at least potentially anti-religious; or it may promote anomie. Substantial amounts of secularism, so often defined as antithetical to religion, may actually be essential if religiously pluralistic societies are to escape high levels of conflict. Thus religiously heterogeneous societies are confronted with serious dilemmas. The numerous and subtle relationships among pluralism, religion, and secularism call for careful analysis.
Citation:
Yinger, J. Milton. Spring 1967. "Pluralism, Religion, and Secularism." Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 6(1): 17-28.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell
DATE ISSUED:
1967
Department:
Sociology
Type:
article
PUBLISHED VERSION:
10.2307/1384190
PERMANENT LINK:
http://hdl.handle.net/11282/310020

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorYinger, J. Miltonen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-23T16:23:27Z-
dc.date.available2013-12-23T16:23:27Z-
dc.date.issued1967en
dc.identifier.citationYinger, J. Milton. Spring 1967. "Pluralism, Religion, and Secularism." Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 6(1): 17-28.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0021-8294en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11282/310020-
dc.description.abstractDisagreements over definitions and consequent difficulties in precise measurement have obscured the study of the relationships among pluralism, religion, and secularism. But the importance of those relationships requires that we attempt to explore them. An emphasis on pluralism, it is suggested, supports religious freedom and tolerance, but it may also support rigidity in religious traditions. Defense of separate religious communities may transfer questions of social integration to secular institutions that are at least potentially anti-religious; or it may promote anomie. Substantial amounts of secularism, so often defined as antithetical to religion, may actually be essential if religiously pluralistic societies are to escape high levels of conflict. Thus religiously heterogeneous societies are confronted with serious dilemmas. The numerous and subtle relationships among pluralism, religion, and secularism call for careful analysis.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwellen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.2307/1384190-
dc.subject.departmentSociologyen_US
dc.titlePluralism, Religion, and Secularismen_US
dc.typearticleen_US
dc.identifier.journalJournal for the Scientific Study of Religionen_US
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