A Comparative Study of the Substructures of Religion

Title:
A Comparative Study of the Substructures of Religion
Authors:
Yinger, J. Milton
Abstract:
This study starts from the premise that religions, in all their diversity, rest upon a common structure: the persistent experience of injustice, suffering, and meaninglessness. The research deals with the responses made by 751 persons from five countries to statements suggesting those themes. Three general hypotheses are tested: 1) that interest in questions of injustice, suffering, and meaninglessness would be widespread among this heterogeneous set of respondents; 2) that the problems would be seen as persistent and intractable; 3) that the belief would prevail, nevertheless, that the problems could finally be dealt with, despite the testimony of experience. Each of these hypothese of six predictor variables was upheld. In addition, several specific hypotheses make predictions regarding the influence of these interests and beliefs, country of citizenship, father's occupation, religious identity, sex, level of education, and major subject of study, with country, religious identity, and education producing some effects.
Citation:
Yinger, J. Milton. 1977. "A Comparative Study of the Substructures of Religion." Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 16(1): 67-86.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell
DATE ISSUED:
1977-03
Department:
Sociology
Type:
article
PUBLISHED VERSION:
10.2307/1386206
PERMANENT LINK:
http://hdl.handle.net/11282/310011

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorYinger, J. Miltonen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-23T16:23:16Z-
dc.date.available2013-12-23T16:23:16Z-
dc.date.issued1977-03en
dc.identifier.citationYinger, J. Milton. 1977. "A Comparative Study of the Substructures of Religion." Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 16(1): 67-86.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0021-8294en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11282/310011-
dc.description.abstractThis study starts from the premise that religions, in all their diversity, rest upon a common structure: the persistent experience of injustice, suffering, and meaninglessness. The research deals with the responses made by 751 persons from five countries to statements suggesting those themes. Three general hypotheses are tested: 1) that interest in questions of injustice, suffering, and meaninglessness would be widespread among this heterogeneous set of respondents; 2) that the problems would be seen as persistent and intractable; 3) that the belief would prevail, nevertheless, that the problems could finally be dealt with, despite the testimony of experience. Each of these hypothese of six predictor variables was upheld. In addition, several specific hypotheses make predictions regarding the influence of these interests and beliefs, country of citizenship, father's occupation, religious identity, sex, level of education, and major subject of study, with country, religious identity, and education producing some effects.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwellen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.2307/1386206-
dc.subject.departmentSociologyen_US
dc.titleA Comparative Study of the Substructures of Religionen_US
dc.typearticleen_US
dc.identifier.journalJournal for the Scientific Study of Religionen_US
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