Presidential Address: Countercultures and Social Change

Title:
Presidential Address: Countercultures and Social Change
Authors:
Yinger, J. Milton
Abstract:
This article focuses on an address on the countercultures and social change. Some individuals and groups feel particularly strongly that the social order is unable to bring them the accustomed or the hoped for satisfactions. Depending on their social location and on their personal tendencies, they attack, strongly or weakly, violently or symbolically, the frustrating social order that is, the normative-power-reciprocity system. The nature of the attack varies widely, with some believing that they have been caught in very bad bargains, others that they are being exploited by unjust and unwise leaders or rulers, and still others emphasizing that they are surrounded by a shoddy system of norms and values. Three elements are found in most protest movements, even though they can be distinguished analytically. Any analysis of countercultures faces this problem. Some use it as a word of opprobrium, an indication, of incivility, depravity, heresy, or sedition. For others, counterculture means hope and salvation, a unique and perhaps final opportunity to get, humankind off the road to destruction.
Citation:
Yinger, J. Milton. 1977. "Presidential Address: Countercultures and Social Change." American Sociological Review 42(6): 833-53.
Publisher:
American Sociological Association
DATE ISSUED:
1977-12
Department:
Sociology
Type:
article
PUBLISHED VERSION:
10.2307/2094571
PERMANENT LINK:
http://hdl.handle.net/11282/310010

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorYinger, J. Miltonen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-23T16:23:15Z-
dc.date.available2013-12-23T16:23:15Z-
dc.date.issued1977-12en
dc.identifier.citationYinger, J. Milton. 1977. "Presidential Address: Countercultures and Social Change." American Sociological Review 42(6): 833-53.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0003-1224en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11282/310010-
dc.description.abstractThis article focuses on an address on the countercultures and social change. Some individuals and groups feel particularly strongly that the social order is unable to bring them the accustomed or the hoped for satisfactions. Depending on their social location and on their personal tendencies, they attack, strongly or weakly, violently or symbolically, the frustrating social order that is, the normative-power-reciprocity system. The nature of the attack varies widely, with some believing that they have been caught in very bad bargains, others that they are being exploited by unjust and unwise leaders or rulers, and still others emphasizing that they are surrounded by a shoddy system of norms and values. Three elements are found in most protest movements, even though they can be distinguished analytically. Any analysis of countercultures faces this problem. Some use it as a word of opprobrium, an indication, of incivility, depravity, heresy, or sedition. For others, counterculture means hope and salvation, a unique and perhaps final opportunity to get, humankind off the road to destruction.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Sociological Associationen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.2307/2094571-
dc.subject.departmentSociologyen_US
dc.titlePresidential Address: Countercultures and Social Changeen_US
dc.typearticleen_US
dc.identifier.journalAmerican Sociological Reviewen_US
dc.subject.keywordSocial changeen_US
dc.subject.keywordCountercultureen_US
dc.subject.keywordSubculturesen_US
dc.subject.keywordSocial orderen_US
dc.subject.keywordSocial structureen_US
dc.subject.keywordSocial normsen_US
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