The Integration of Americans of Indian Descent

Title:
The Integration of Americans of Indian Descent
Authors:
Yinger, J. Milton; Simpson, George Eaton
Abstract:
When the members of two societies come into contact, changes in the direction of assimilation may occur on four different levels-biological, psychological, cultural, and structural, or, in more descriptive terms, amalgamation, identification, acculturation, and integration may take place. At present, most Indians favor integration but resist forced acculturation. The integration and cultural assimilation of Native Americans have been inhibited by a number of fundamental differences between the majority culture and the cultures of Indian peoples. At the same time, other factors have furthered integration and cultural assimilation. Migration, urbanization, education, economic changes, and intermarriage will facilitate structural integration, a shared identity, and cultural assimilation. In time, full assimilation, or the interaction of all persons without reference to ethnic or racial descent, may come about. For the immediate future, however, pluralism, associated with increasing acculturation and structural integration, seems to be the most likely pattern of relationship between most Indians and non-Indians.
Citation:
Yinger, J. Milton and George Eaton Simpson. 1978. "The Integration of Americans of Indian Descent." Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 436(1): 137-51.
Publisher:
SAGE Publications
DATE ISSUED:
1978-03
Department:
Sociology
Type:
article
PUBLISHED VERSION:
10.1177/000271627843600113
PERMANENT LINK:
http://hdl.handle.net/11282/310009

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorYinger, J. Miltonen_US
dc.contributor.authorSimpson, George Eatonen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-23T16:23:13Z-
dc.date.available2013-12-23T16:23:13Z-
dc.date.issued1978-03en
dc.identifier.citationYinger, J. Milton and George Eaton Simpson. 1978. "The Integration of Americans of Indian Descent." Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 436(1): 137-51.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0002-7162en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11282/310009-
dc.description.abstractWhen the members of two societies come into contact, changes in the direction of assimilation may occur on four different levels-biological, psychological, cultural, and structural, or, in more descriptive terms, amalgamation, identification, acculturation, and integration may take place. At present, most Indians favor integration but resist forced acculturation. The integration and cultural assimilation of Native Americans have been inhibited by a number of fundamental differences between the majority culture and the cultures of Indian peoples. At the same time, other factors have furthered integration and cultural assimilation. Migration, urbanization, education, economic changes, and intermarriage will facilitate structural integration, a shared identity, and cultural assimilation. In time, full assimilation, or the interaction of all persons without reference to ethnic or racial descent, may come about. For the immediate future, however, pluralism, associated with increasing acculturation and structural integration, seems to be the most likely pattern of relationship between most Indians and non-Indians.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherSAGE Publicationsen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/000271627843600113-
dc.subject.departmentSociologyen_US
dc.titleThe Integration of Americans of Indian Descenten_US
dc.typearticleen_US
dc.identifier.journalAnnals of the American Academy of Political and Social Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.volume436en
dc.identifier.issue1en
dc.identifier.startpage137en
All Items in The Five Colleges of Ohio Digital Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.