Tongan Chiefly Language: The Formation Of An Honorific Speech Register

Title:
Tongan Chiefly Language: The Formation Of An Honorific Speech Register
Authors:
Haugen, Jason D.; Philips, Susan U.
Abstract:
In this paper we examine the formation over time of a lexical honorific speech register, Tongan lea faka'eiki, or 'chiefly language'. Use of the comparative historical method enables us to consider honorific register formation within a framework of greater temporal and spatial scope that has been typical for studies of register formation, and to identify some properties of such formation that have not been documented before. Our evidence shows that the higher and lower levels of honorification in this speech register have been formed at different times and through predominantly different etymological processes, even as they draw on the same broader set of word formation processes. In recorded speech, the differences between the sources of the two sub-registers are even more pronounced, preserving and reproducing the historical differences in their formation.*
Citation:
Haugen, Jason D., and Susan U. Philips. 2010. "Tongan Chiefly Language: The Formation Of An Honorific Speech Register." Language In Society 39(5): 589-616.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
DATE ISSUED:
2010-11
Department:
Anthropology
Type:
article
PUBLISHED VERSION:
10.1017/S004740451000062X
PERMANENT LINK:
http://hdl.handle.net/11282/309995

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHaugen, Jason D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPhilips, Susan U.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-23T16:22:52Z-
dc.date.available2013-12-23T16:22:52Z-
dc.date.issued2010-11en
dc.identifier.citationHaugen, Jason D., and Susan U. Philips. 2010. "Tongan Chiefly Language: The Formation Of An Honorific Speech Register." Language In Society 39(5): 589-616.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0047-4045en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11282/309995-
dc.description.abstractIn this paper we examine the formation over time of a lexical honorific speech register, Tongan lea faka'eiki, or 'chiefly language'. Use of the comparative historical method enables us to consider honorific register formation within a framework of greater temporal and spatial scope that has been typical for studies of register formation, and to identify some properties of such formation that have not been documented before. Our evidence shows that the higher and lower levels of honorification in this speech register have been formed at different times and through predominantly different etymological processes, even as they draw on the same broader set of word formation processes. In recorded speech, the differences between the sources of the two sub-registers are even more pronounced, preserving and reproducing the historical differences in their formation.*en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherCambridge University Pressen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S004740451000062X-
dc.subject.departmentAnthropologyen_US
dc.titleTongan Chiefly Language: The Formation Of An Honorific Speech Registeren_US
dc.typearticleen_US
dc.identifier.journalLanguage In Societyen_US
dc.subject.keywordLinguisticsen_US
dc.subject.keywordSociologyen_US
dc.identifier.volume39en_US
dc.identifier.issue5en_US
dc.identifier.startpage589en_US
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