Do People Remember The Temporal Proximity Of Unrelated Events?

Title:
Do People Remember The Temporal Proximity Of Unrelated Events?
Authors:
Friedman, William J.; Janssen, Steve M. J.
Abstract:
In the present study, we tested the ability to remember the temporal proximity of two unrelated events that had happened within 7 days of one another. In three experiments, 1,909 participants judged whether pairs of news events, ranging in age from 1 month to about 6 years, had occurred within a week of each other and, if not, how far apart they had occurred. Some event pairs were related, and others were unrelated. For unrelated event pairs, same-week and separation judgments were very poor. Accuracy was much greater for both kinds of judgments when the events were related. Participants often guessed the separation of unrelated event pairs, whereas they frequently deduced the separation or remembered the proximity of related event pairs. For both types of pairs, the participants reported using the strength of the memories or the general period in which the events had occurred.
Citation:
Friedman, William J., and Steve M. J. Janssen. 2010. "Do People Remember The Temporal Proximity Of Unrelated Events?." Memory & Cognition 38(8): 1122-1136.
Publisher:
Psychonomic Society
DATE ISSUED:
2010-12
Department:
Psychology
Type:
article
PUBLISHED VERSION:
10.3758/MC.38.8.1122
PERMANENT LINK:
http://hdl.handle.net/11282/309964

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFriedman, William J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorJanssen, Steve M. J.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-23T16:22:10Z-
dc.date.available2013-12-23T16:22:10Z-
dc.date.issued2010-12en
dc.identifier.citationFriedman, William J., and Steve M. J. Janssen. 2010. "Do People Remember The Temporal Proximity Of Unrelated Events?." Memory & Cognition 38(8): 1122-1136.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0090-502Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11282/309964-
dc.description.abstractIn the present study, we tested the ability to remember the temporal proximity of two unrelated events that had happened within 7 days of one another. In three experiments, 1,909 participants judged whether pairs of news events, ranging in age from 1 month to about 6 years, had occurred within a week of each other and, if not, how far apart they had occurred. Some event pairs were related, and others were unrelated. For unrelated event pairs, same-week and separation judgments were very poor. Accuracy was much greater for both kinds of judgments when the events were related. Participants often guessed the separation of unrelated event pairs, whereas they frequently deduced the separation or remembered the proximity of related event pairs. For both types of pairs, the participants reported using the strength of the memories or the general period in which the events had occurred.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherPsychonomic Societyen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3758/MC.38.8.1122-
dc.subject.departmentPsychologyen_US
dc.titleDo People Remember The Temporal Proximity Of Unrelated Events?en_US
dc.typearticleen_US
dc.identifier.journalMemory & Cognitionen_US
dc.subject.keywordLong-term-memoryen_US
dc.subject.keywordAutobiographical memoryen_US
dc.subject.keywordReminiscence bumpen_US
dc.subject.keywordAdult neurogenesisen_US
dc.subject.keywordFlashbulb memoriesen_US
dc.identifier.volume38en_US
dc.identifier.issue8en_US
dc.identifier.startpage1122en_US
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