Low Luteinizing Hormone Enhances Spatial Memory And Has Protective Effects On Memory Loss In Rats

Title:
Low Luteinizing Hormone Enhances Spatial Memory And Has Protective Effects On Memory Loss In Rats
Authors:
Ziegler, Shira G.; Thornton, Janice E.
Abstract:
Though several studies have suggested that estradiol improves hippocampal-dependent spatial memory, the effects of other hormones in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis on memory have largely been ignored. Estradiol and luteinizing hormone (LH) are generally inversely related and LH may significantly affect spatial memory. Ovariectomized (ovx) rats treated with Antide (a gonadotropin releasing hormone receptor antagonist) had low LH levels and showed enhanced spatial memory, comparable to treatment with estradiol. Antide-treated ovx females retained spatial memory longer than estradiol-treated ovx females. Deficits in spatial memory are a primary symptom of neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Treatment with Antide prevented spatial memory deficits in a neurotoxin-induced model typical of early AD. These data suggest that memory impairments seen in female rats after ovariectomy or women after menopause may be due to high LH levels and that a reduction in LH enhances memory. These results also implicate an LH lowering agent as a potential preventative therapy for AD.
Citation:
Ziegler, Shira G., and Janice E. Thornton. 2010. "Low Luteinizing Hormone Enhances Spatial Memory And Has Protective Effects On Memory Loss In Rats." Hormones And Behavior 58(5): 705-713.
Publisher:
Academic Press/Elsevier Science
DATE ISSUED:
2010-11
Department:
Neuroscience
Type:
article
PUBLISHED VERSION:
10.1016/j.yhbeh.2010.07.002
PERMANENT LINK:
http://hdl.handle.net/11282/309945

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorZiegler, Shira G.en_US
dc.contributor.authorThornton, Janice E.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-23T16:21:47Z-
dc.date.available2013-12-23T16:21:47Z-
dc.date.issued2010-11en
dc.identifier.citationZiegler, Shira G., and Janice E. Thornton. 2010. "Low Luteinizing Hormone Enhances Spatial Memory And Has Protective Effects On Memory Loss In Rats." Hormones And Behavior 58(5): 705-713.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0018-506Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11282/309945-
dc.description.abstractThough several studies have suggested that estradiol improves hippocampal-dependent spatial memory, the effects of other hormones in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis on memory have largely been ignored. Estradiol and luteinizing hormone (LH) are generally inversely related and LH may significantly affect spatial memory. Ovariectomized (ovx) rats treated with Antide (a gonadotropin releasing hormone receptor antagonist) had low LH levels and showed enhanced spatial memory, comparable to treatment with estradiol. Antide-treated ovx females retained spatial memory longer than estradiol-treated ovx females. Deficits in spatial memory are a primary symptom of neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Treatment with Antide prevented spatial memory deficits in a neurotoxin-induced model typical of early AD. These data suggest that memory impairments seen in female rats after ovariectomy or women after menopause may be due to high LH levels and that a reduction in LH enhances memory. These results also implicate an LH lowering agent as a potential preventative therapy for AD.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherAcademic Press/Elsevier Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.yhbeh.2010.07.002-
dc.subject.departmentNeuroscienceen_US
dc.titleLow Luteinizing Hormone Enhances Spatial Memory And Has Protective Effects On Memory Loss In Ratsen_US
dc.typearticleen_US
dc.identifier.journalHormones And Behavioren_US
dc.subject.keywordLuteinizing hormoneen_US
dc.subject.keywordSpatial memoryen_US
dc.subject.keywordAlzheimer's diseaseen_US
dc.subject.keywordHippocampusen_US
dc.subject.keywordMemoryen_US
dc.subject.keywordEstrogenen_US
dc.identifier.volume58en_US
dc.identifier.issue5en_US
dc.identifier.startpage705en_US
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