Predicting The Post-fire Establishment And Persistence Of An Invasive Tree Species Across A Complex Landscape

Title:
Predicting The Post-fire Establishment And Persistence Of An Invasive Tree Species Across A Complex Landscape
Authors:
Kuppinger, Dane M.; Jenkins, Michael A.; White, Peter S.
Abstract:
The reintroduction of pre-European fire regimes has allowed the entry of many invasive plant species into fire-dependant ecosystems of North America. However, the environmental factors that favor the post-fire establishment of these species across complex landscapes are not well understood and the initial establishment of invasive species does not necessarily result in long-term persistence. To evaluate the post-fire establishment and persistence of disturbance-dependent invasive plants, we studied the invasion of Paulownia tomentosa (princess tree, an early-successional species introduced from Asia) across three burns in the southern Appalachian Mountains. Based upon classification tree analysis, the presence/absence of P. tomentosa 2 years after burning was most strongly related to the cover of residual vegetation, topographic shading, and moisture availability. Spatial application of classification tree models to repeated survey data showed that P. tomentosa established across a wide range of microsites 2 years after burning. However, predicted habitat for P. tomentosa decreased by 63% 4 years after fire and by 73% 6 years after fire. Following its initial widespread establishment, P. tomentosa only persisted on xeric and exposed topographic positions that experienced high intensity burning. However, the sites where it persisted include rare community types that contain two endangered plant species that depend upon fire for successful reproduction. The control of P. tomentosa on these ecologically important sites may require special attention from land managers.
Citation:
Kuppinger, Dane M., Michael A. Jenkins, and Peter S. White. 2010. "Predicting The Post-fire Establishment And Persistence Of An Invasive Tree Species Across A Complex Landscape." Biological Invasions 12(10): 3473-3484.
Publisher:
Springer
DATE ISSUED:
2010-10
Department:
Environmental Studies
Type:
article
PUBLISHED VERSION:
10.1007/s10530-010-9745-4
PERMANENT LINK:
http://hdl.handle.net/11282/309920

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKuppinger, Dane M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorJenkins, Michael A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWhite, Peter S.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-23T16:21:04Z-
dc.date.available2013-12-23T16:21:04Z-
dc.date.issued2010-10en
dc.identifier.citationKuppinger, Dane M., Michael A. Jenkins, and Peter S. White. 2010. "Predicting The Post-fire Establishment And Persistence Of An Invasive Tree Species Across A Complex Landscape." Biological Invasions 12(10): 3473-3484.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1387-3547en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11282/309920-
dc.description.abstractThe reintroduction of pre-European fire regimes has allowed the entry of many invasive plant species into fire-dependant ecosystems of North America. However, the environmental factors that favor the post-fire establishment of these species across complex landscapes are not well understood and the initial establishment of invasive species does not necessarily result in long-term persistence. To evaluate the post-fire establishment and persistence of disturbance-dependent invasive plants, we studied the invasion of Paulownia tomentosa (princess tree, an early-successional species introduced from Asia) across three burns in the southern Appalachian Mountains. Based upon classification tree analysis, the presence/absence of P. tomentosa 2 years after burning was most strongly related to the cover of residual vegetation, topographic shading, and moisture availability. Spatial application of classification tree models to repeated survey data showed that P. tomentosa established across a wide range of microsites 2 years after burning. However, predicted habitat for P. tomentosa decreased by 63% 4 years after fire and by 73% 6 years after fire. Following its initial widespread establishment, P. tomentosa only persisted on xeric and exposed topographic positions that experienced high intensity burning. However, the sites where it persisted include rare community types that contain two endangered plant species that depend upon fire for successful reproduction. The control of P. tomentosa on these ecologically important sites may require special attention from land managers.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherSpringeren_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10530-010-9745-4-
dc.subject.departmentEnvironmental Studiesen_US
dc.titlePredicting The Post-fire Establishment And Persistence Of An Invasive Tree Species Across A Complex Landscapeen_US
dc.typearticleen_US
dc.identifier.journalBiological Invasionsen_US
dc.subject.keywordPaulownia tomentosaen_US
dc.subject.keywordInvasive speciesen_US
dc.subject.keywordSouthern Appalachiansen_US
dc.subject.keywordFireen_US
dc.subject.keywordXeric forestsen_US
dc.identifier.volume12en_US
dc.identifier.issue10en_US
dc.identifier.startpage3473en_US
All Items in The Five Colleges of Ohio Digital Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.