Title:
From new Labour to no Labour?
Authors:
Howell, Chris
Abstract:
This paper addresses the question of whether there is, any longer, a distinctive Left form of industrial relations. It does so through an examination of what the metamorphosis of the British Labour Party has meant for industrial relations policy, and hence the role of organized labor in the British political economy. An examination of the Blair government's record thus far suggests that it has attempted, albeit in a half-hearted way, to construct a "Third Way" in industrial relations policy through the provision of a new set of individual rights to workers, in contrast to providing a set of collective rights for trade unions. However, this strategy has been fatally compromised by the shift towards neo-liberal economic policy, which precludes a distinctive industrial relations policy, and a unitarist conception of class relations on the part of New Labour.
Citation:
Howell, Chris. "From New Labour to No Labour? The Industrial Relations Project of the Blair Government in Britain," New Political Science, 22:2 (June 2000), pp. 201-229.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
DATE ISSUED:
2000-06
Department:
Politics
Type:
article
Additional Links:
http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/content~db=jour~content=a713687914~frm=abslink
PERMANENT LINK:
http://hdl.handle.net/11282/309896

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHowell, Chrisen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-23T16:20:37Z-
dc.date.available2013-12-23T16:20:37Z-
dc.date.issued2000-06en
dc.identifier.citationHowell, Chris. "From New Labour to No Labour? The Industrial Relations Project of the Blair Government in Britain," New Political Science, 22:2 (June 2000), pp. 201-229.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11282/309896-
dc.description.abstractThis paper addresses the question of whether there is, any longer, a distinctive Left form of industrial relations. It does so through an examination of what the metamorphosis of the British Labour Party has meant for industrial relations policy, and hence the role of organized labor in the British political economy. An examination of the Blair government's record thus far suggests that it has attempted, albeit in a half-hearted way, to construct a "Third Way" in industrial relations policy through the provision of a new set of individual rights to workers, in contrast to providing a set of collective rights for trade unions. However, this strategy has been fatally compromised by the shift towards neo-liberal economic policy, which precludes a distinctive industrial relations policy, and a unitarist conception of class relations on the part of New Labour.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherTaylor and Francisen_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.informaworld.com/smpp/content~db=jour~content=a713687914~frm=abslinken_GB
dc.subject.departmentPoliticsen_US
dc.titleFrom new Labour to no Labour?en_US
dc.typearticleen_US
dc.identifier.journalNew Political Scienceen_US
dc.subject.keywordIndustrial relationsen_US
dc.subject.keywordNew Leften_US
dc.subject.keywordLabor unionsen_US
dc.subject.keywordNew Labour Party (Great Britain)en_US
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