Medial prefrontal cortex lesions impair decision-making on a rodent gambling task: Reversal by D1 receptor antagonist administration

Title:
Medial prefrontal cortex lesions impair decision-making on a rodent gambling task: Reversal by D1 receptor antagonist administration
Authors:
Paine, Tracie A.; Asinof, Samuel K.; Diehl, Geoffrey W.; Frackman, Anna; Leffler, Joseph
Abstract:
Decision-making is a complex cognitive process that is impaired in a number of psychiatric disorders. In the laboratory, decision-making is frequently assessed using “gambling” tasks that are designed to simulate real-life decisions in terms of uncertainty, reward and punishment. Here, we investigate whether lesions of the medial prefrontal cortex (PFC) cause impairments in decision-making using a rodent gambling task (rGT). In this task, rats have to decide between 1 of 4 possible options: 2 options are considered “advantageous” and lead to greater net rewards (food pellets) than the other 2 “disadvantageous” options. Once rats attained stable levels of performance on the rGT they underwent sham or excitoxic lesions of the medial PFC and were allowed to recover for 1 week. Following recovery, rats were retrained for 5 days and then the effects of a dopamine D1-like receptor antagonist (SCH23390) or a D2-like receptor antagonist (haloperidol) on performance were assessed. Lesioned rats exhibited impaired decision-making: they made fewer advantageous choices and chose the most optimal choice less frequently than did sham-operated rats. Administration of SCH23390 (0.03 mg/kg), but not haloperidol (0.015–0.03 mg/kg) attenuated the lesion-induced decision-making deficit. These results indicate that the medial PFC is important for decision-making and that excessive signaling at D1 receptors may contribute to decision-making impairments.
Citation:
Paine, Tracie A., S.K. Asinof, G.W. Diehl, A. Frackman, and J. Leffler. 2013. "Medial prefrontal cortex lesions impair decision-making on a rodent gambling task: Reversal by D1 receptor antagonist administration." Behavioural Brain Research 243: 247-254.
Publisher:
Elsevier
DATE ISSUED:
2013-04-15
Department:
Neuroscience
Type:
article
PUBLISHED VERSION:
10.1016/j.bbr.2013.01.018
PERMANENT LINK:
http://hdl.handle.net/11282/309710

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPaine, Tracie A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAsinof, Samuel K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDiehl, Geoffrey W.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFrackman, Annaen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeffler, Josephen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-23T16:16:03Zen
dc.date.available2013-12-23T16:16:03Zen
dc.date.issued2013-04-15en
dc.identifier.citationPaine, Tracie A., S.K. Asinof, G.W. Diehl, A. Frackman, and J. Leffler. 2013. "Medial prefrontal cortex lesions impair decision-making on a rodent gambling task: Reversal by D1 receptor antagonist administration." Behavioural Brain Research 243: 247-254.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0166-4328en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11282/309710en
dc.description.abstractDecision-making is a complex cognitive process that is impaired in a number of psychiatric disorders. In the laboratory, decision-making is frequently assessed using “gambling” tasks that are designed to simulate real-life decisions in terms of uncertainty, reward and punishment. Here, we investigate whether lesions of the medial prefrontal cortex (PFC) cause impairments in decision-making using a rodent gambling task (rGT). In this task, rats have to decide between 1 of 4 possible options: 2 options are considered “advantageous” and lead to greater net rewards (food pellets) than the other 2 “disadvantageous” options. Once rats attained stable levels of performance on the rGT they underwent sham or excitoxic lesions of the medial PFC and were allowed to recover for 1 week. Following recovery, rats were retrained for 5 days and then the effects of a dopamine D1-like receptor antagonist (SCH23390) or a D2-like receptor antagonist (haloperidol) on performance were assessed. Lesioned rats exhibited impaired decision-making: they made fewer advantageous choices and chose the most optimal choice less frequently than did sham-operated rats. Administration of SCH23390 (0.03 mg/kg), but not haloperidol (0.015–0.03 mg/kg) attenuated the lesion-induced decision-making deficit. These results indicate that the medial PFC is important for decision-making and that excessive signaling at D1 receptors may contribute to decision-making impairments.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.bbr.2013.01.018en
dc.subject.departmentNeuroscienceen_US
dc.titleMedial prefrontal cortex lesions impair decision-making on a rodent gambling task: Reversal by D1 receptor antagonist administrationen_US
dc.typearticleen_US
dc.identifier.journalBehavioural Brain Researchen_US
dc.subject.keywordRodent gambling tasken_US
dc.subject.keywordMedial prefrontal cortexen_US
dc.subject.keywordDopamineen_US
dc.subject.keywordLesionen_US
dc.subject.keywordSCH23390en_US
dc.subject.keywordHaloperidolen_US
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